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Oasis Writer 04-20-2006 03:25 PM

What Are You Reading?
 
I tend to read too many fantasy books. Right now though, I'm reading a medical journal my grandpa used to own. I recently read Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince (J.K. Rowling).

What is everyone else reading right now?

kal 04-20-2006 03:27 PM

right now, not a lot. I attempted to read Falling leaves while I was away but that didn't work out very well.

So it's all work based stuff,
Ibsen's Hedda Gabler,
Willy Russell's Blood Brothers (and Our Day Out, just because its sublime)
Lots of arthurin legends stuff, and I think I will have to recap on JAmes Herberts Once for a story I'm doing involving faeries.

Oasis Writer 04-20-2006 03:32 PM

I'm about to start a new book in a few days called "The First King of Shannara" by Terry Brooks. I've heard awesome things about it, so I might start it soon.

kal 04-20-2006 03:39 PM

I'm tempted to start a trilogy my sister just bough by Garth Nix, ease myself into fantasy before I'm thrown into studying it in Spetember.

Oasis Writer 04-20-2006 03:43 PM

Good thinking, if you are going to go into a class of some subject, I recommend you read some. If you want to get into fantasy quick, I recommend Harry Potter, or any book from Terry Brooks, J.R. Tolken, or the dude that wrote The Chronicles of Narnia. Easy, simple child books, or teenage based, but good to get into them and the genre.

starrwriter 04-20-2006 03:48 PM

"Leaving Las Vegas" by John O'Brien (again) and a collection of short stories by Chekhov. Rather grim fare, but well written.

kal 04-20-2006 04:04 PM

I've read Harry Potter or rather I missed the first 2, and yeah nice story but I wasn't gripped by the way it was told.. I don't see Rowling as a great writer but rather a nifter little storyteller.

I plan to write fantasy over the coming months to get me into it, although don't expect typical fantsy from me, I just don't like it. Swords and half breed things just aint my style.

Oasis Writer 04-20-2006 04:41 PM

Fantasy can be anything you make it. My Crimson Tourniquet is Gothic Fantasy, and yet, the only thing that I've used to make it that way is the chimeras and homonculus references. And in my second chapter, not one fantasy thing so far. So, it's what you make it. I'm sure you'll do awesome on the story though. What book is really gripping you into fantasy, or have you found one?

kal 04-20-2006 04:49 PM

there isn't a book just landscapes. I was at this waterfall in cornwall where theres a great litle folktale and I half imagined faeries and whatnot to be there so that got me thinking, and then i heard a story about a mermaid in another beautiful village we went to, and since then I've been wantingto write more about otherworld sorts of things. and It cant hurt to attempt to learn another side of my craft so i'm going for the fantasy module next year.

TimD 04-20-2006 04:50 PM

Traitor General, by Dan Abnett. a Warhammer 40K novel.

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/im...24/n123854.jpg

The Gaunt Ghosts series is pretty interesting and Dan Abnett is a pretty good writer of this genre and has been involved with comics for donkeys years.

Oasis Writer 04-20-2006 05:08 PM

Awesome, how far are you and would you recommend it for someone that doesn't read a lot of war, like me?

TimD 04-21-2006 04:29 AM

I'm halfway through this novel. It's set in the 40K universe so it's about quick deaths, intense firefights, people getting chopped to pieces by evil weapons. I'm into scifi and appreciate military scifi the most. (Me Tarzan, Tarzan got plenty of test-os-ter-one)

Oasis Writer 04-21-2006 06:11 AM

Are there Tarzan books like that? Tell me more about your book.

kellykat60409 04-21-2006 07:58 AM

right now i am reading the witching hour by Ann rice, but it is slow reading, antigone by Sophocles, and i have plan to read the Aeneid by Virgil.

Titania 04-21-2006 01:43 PM

By reading I presume you mean actively reading and not the piles of half-finished books I have lying around my room...

Hm.

Across the Nightengale Floor by Liam Hearn... sort of fantasy with a Japanese flavor
re-reading This Way for the Gas, Ladies & Gentlemen by Tadeusz Borowski since I have a test on it soon, but that's not exactly for fun
and Guernica by Gijs van Hensbergen (sp?), which is a very intriguing book

Wisp 04-21-2006 02:54 PM

Re-reading Shade's Children by Garth Nix.

Oasis Writer 04-21-2006 04:10 PM

Would any of you three recommend those stories to a reader that knows nothing of them, and if you have time, would you give a little description of them?

Titania 04-21-2006 04:26 PM

Let's see...

Across the Nightengale Floor I really enjoyed (this is my 2nd time reading it); it's set in a feudal country that echoes Japan and follows a young boy whose parents were recently killed and who is adopted for mysterious reasons by a Lord Otori. It has significant amounts of political intrigue and some romance, and also a fantasy twist demonstrated by Takeo (the main character's) strange stealth / observation abilities and the strange, hidden Tribe. I'd recommend it, I suppose, especially if someone likes Japanese culture. There's at least one or two sequels, although I haven't read them.

This Way for the Gas is something I think people should read, but by no means is it a pleasure book. It was written by a Polish employee (prisoner, really, but treated fairly well considering) at the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camps and relates events with such nonchalance and normality that the effect is terribly chilling. I know that for me, reading it was an... experience, especially since one of my best friends is Jewish. People should read it simply to understand the depths of depravity humans are capable of, but again, if you're looking for a casual read, this is not it.

Guernica is non-fiction, and it's really more art history than anything else - it chronicles the inspiration for, creation of, and overall life of Pablo Picasso's famous anti-War painting. In the process it gives some good insight into the Spanish Civil War in general, from what I've seen so far. And it has some entertaining quotes from Picasso :)

Cuchulain 04-21-2006 09:14 PM

Right now, I'm reading Ishmael by Daniel Quinn and it's absolutely fascinating.

It's billed as a fiction novel but really its more like non fiction. It's a very intesive criticism of civillization and it's going to make you question your entire existance.

Other books I'm reading are Che: A Revolutionary Life and Ivanhoe

Dephere 04-21-2006 10:19 PM

I just finished The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas...It was originally written in French, but the translation was awesome. The writing was nice and kept me into th story. I HIGHLY recommend it to anyone who likes literary novels. Even if you don't like classics this is a good book to burst into the scene. There is action and romance woven in quite nicely.

Just yesterday I bought Les Miserables by Victor Hugo (the guy who wrote The Hunchback of Notre Dame). When I first looked at it I kind of shirked from the sheer girth of the novel, a whopping 1200 pages, but the writing is simply awesome. The words and the reflections really give you insight into humans and make the characters feel so dang real.

I'm only a hundred pages in and so far only 1 main character has been introduced and one semi main character. So it's a bit slow moving, but the writing is crazy good in my opinion.

So, that's a basic rundown of what I'm reading.

kellykat60409 04-21-2006 10:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Titania
By reading I presume you mean actively reading and not the piles of half-finished books I have lying around my room...

Hm.

Across the Nightengale Floor by Liam Hearn... sort of fantasy with a Japanese flavor
re-reading This Way for the Gas, Ladies & Gentlemen by Tadeusz Borowski since I have a test on it soon, but that's not exactly for fun
and Guernica by Gijs van Hensbergen (sp?), which is a very intriguing book

I read two to three books at a time

Oasis Writer 04-21-2006 10:53 PM

Those are all awesome books all! :D Very impressed to see an active Forum of readers. Always helps with writing skills.

What are you read kellykat60409?

Icarus 04-22-2006 10:17 AM

Just finished The DaVinci Code a few days ago and am currently bogged down in reading for classes. Up next will probably be the first of the Master and Commander books.

For classes: Macbeth for the fourth time in four years (really boring this time around!), The Cheese and the Worms, The Sound of Two Hands Clapping and the list goes on and on....

dogwood 04-22-2006 10:23 AM

right now, nothing. because, i just finished a million books for school, most of which were good. the ones i was recently reading are:

one flew over the cuckoo's nest by Ken Kesey - BRILLIANT
Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller - ughh.... i wrote an essay destroying this hahaha
A complicated Kindness by Miriam Towes - very good book.
Oranges are not the only fruit by Jeanette Winterson - also v. good but sad
in the skin of a lion by Michael Ondaatje: i didn't like this much even tho he is a world famous author, his writing and characters are OVERLy romantic!

and now we're reading King Lear. ugh, I am sorry, I cannot deal with shakespear... i have fallen asleep too much in english class. ha

in the future however, i intend to read some short stories. i need to learn short story strucutre!!

Icarus 04-22-2006 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dogwood
and now we're reading King Lear. ugh, I am sorry, I cannot deal with shakespear... i have fallen asleep too much in english class. ha

I know what you mean about King Lear. Wasn't a fan myself. Gloucester and Kent were far more sympathetic to me than old Lear.

kal 04-22-2006 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wisp
Re-reading Shade's Children by Garth Nix.

Is he good?? my sister bought a trilogy of his and I'm wondering wether I should nick them or not..

kal 04-22-2006 01:12 PM

Oh god. I hate it when people say shakespeare makes them fall asleep.. it's not the writing thats doing this to you its the lesson..

Go see a shakespeare play, see it performed and you won't think it's boring anymore and if you do you could be a product of the flashing, action packed generation the media created which would be a shame..

dogwood 04-22-2006 02:22 PM

ouch, i really hope i'm not a product of the "flashing action packed generation the media created"...

of course the lesson makes it more boring, and i have never seen shakespeare performed live. however, with no insult to shakespeare - he is brilliant, i just don't enjoy reading old english. some people are better at interpreting than others, but i'd rather see/read a play where i can understand right away what the characters are saying.

and Icarus, yes, old Lear is a moron. come to think of it, that play has a lot of insane old men.

Cuchulain 04-22-2006 02:24 PM

Everyone in my English class hates Shakespeare except me. I love his work because I find it to be very insightful, and often times, exciting. I think they should stop teaching him so then maybe kids will actually watch/read the plays.

I also liked antigone, so much so that I named my pet tortoise 'Antigone'

Quote:

come to think of it, that play has a lot of insane old men.
Wasn't the whole basis of the play about Lear going insane?

kal 04-22-2006 02:38 PM

we kept saying anti gone to annoy a teacher, I don't think I ever actually studied it..

When you see Shakespeare performed, you'll understand it all so much better... it's a play it's not meant to be read, it's meant to be performed.


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