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Ember 05-19-2012 10:54 AM

Favorite author?
 
Who is your favorite author and why? Do you feel like your writing has been influenced by them, or is your style similar and that is why you like them?

Loz 05-19-2012 11:06 AM

Hmm, decisions. Sophie Hannah, I think. I love that her books always surprise me, the characters are great and I can never predict the end. Nope, I don't write like her. No chance and never will :)

You?

Ember 05-19-2012 11:56 AM

I am not familiar with Sophie Hannah. What kind of books does she write other than surprising ones? :)

I think I would have to say that my favorite is Roald Dahl. I have always enjoyed his ingenuity and imagination. Most of his books are stand alone and short, yet I can so easily be drawn in by the world he creates and his quirky characters. James and the giant peach, and Charlie and the chocolate factory are particularly great examples of how unique his work is. My favorite though, is Matilda!

I wish my books could be as creative as his! I do like to add a bit of humor as he does through quirky individuals in my stories. I would say some of my style has been influenced by him.

Loz 05-19-2012 12:15 PM

She writes psychological thrillers: http://www.sophiehannah.com

I can remember the first time I read James and the Giant Peach, I had such wierd dreams for weeks! Great book.

Crowne 05-19-2012 12:19 PM

Didn't Sophie Hannah write thrillers? (Edit: Loz answered this question before I finished my post, lol)
I wouldn't know for sure because I've never actually read a book by her (perhaps I should? Any suggestions where to start?).

I also appreciate Roald Dahl especially Matilda. I loved that book, I've read it a million times and even enjoyed watching the movie every year during Christmas holidays.

Personally I like Rick Riordan the best. I love how he managed to put so much of the ancient culture into his stories and made it fun for young and old, whether they are educated in culture or not. I respect writers that can attract readers from all different ethnic groups in the world. I love his characters, to me he's simply marvelous.
Did I adapt his writing skill? All though my style looks similar to his, I can't say I adapted it from him since I've been writing like this before I started reading Riordan.

Ember 05-19-2012 12:52 PM

Loz, Thrillers can be fun sometimes as long as I'm not home alone! Next time I'm in the mood for one perhaps I'll pick up one by Sophie Hannah. Any one in particularly you would reccomend?

Crowne, Yes, I loved the movie Matilda too! I think they did a great job bringing it to life.

I didn't recognize the Name Rick Riordin, but after looking it up, I recognized his books. I havn't read them, but after seeing the lightning thief at the theater, I did want to give him a try. Thanks for reminding me!

Crowne 05-19-2012 12:57 PM

Oh no, please don't base the stories on that movie.
It was horrible! I'm not sure how they are going to fix how much they messed up there. They almost did worse than they did at the Eragon movie! Ridiculous. The story cannot be compared to the movie. They made so many mistakes it was a different story all together.
It's so hurtful to see that people refuse to read books because the movie was bad and not only Riordan's books.
Oh well, I guess that's the reason why the order should always be: Read the book, then watch the movie.

Ember 05-19-2012 01:48 PM

Haha, yeah I know that is usually the case with movies. That is why I am still willing to give the books a try. Even though the movie was pretty bad, I liked the concept. I usually like to read books before movies too, but this one was playing at the dollar theater so I didn't have much to lose!

Loz 05-19-2012 02:02 PM

Pick up any of the Sophie Hannah books, I have read them all and each one is as good as the other!

I haven't read a riordan book yet. I will have a look when I'm next in the library. And yup, I agree about Eragon. Everytime I read the blurb for the movie I think it's going to be awesome and then it comes on and I remember, Oh, it's that movie :mad:

K. Klein 05-19-2012 04:15 PM

Favorite author? You mean we only get to pick one?

Hard question.

I think I'd choose Lois McMaster Bujold, and I certainly hope my writing has been influenced by her, because her stuff is amazing. She has the most completely alive characters of pretty much any author I've read.

I'm also addicted to David Weber, particularly the Honor Harrington series and the Bazhell books. He manages to pack in an amazing amount of political intrigue and interesting plot twists.

I've been enjoying a lot of Holly Lisle's stuff lately as well, her fiction is very good but I admit it's her "how to write" books that I'm truly addicted to :D

Rocker 05-19-2012 04:58 PM

It's very hard to pinpoint one favourite author. Mine changes all the time. I'll read a book and get hooked and have to buy and read as much as I can by that particular author.
My first love was Michael Moorcock when I was in my teens. Then it was Tolkien. Over the years I've read numerous authors such as King, koontz, Herbert and Barker for horror related stuff. For fantasy, Feist is head and shoulders above the crowd. For humour I love Pratchett, Adams, Sharpe, Grant/Naylor. For downright sheer awesomeness I cannot recommend highly enough, Conn Iggulden. Just finsihed his Conqueror series about Genghis Khan. Major WOW factor. My current favourite though, is Neil Gaiman.

I don't think my writing is influenced by any of them. It's all about genre. Certain genres need a certain style of writing and each author does it his own way. All I can hope is that my writing is enjoyed as much as theirs is..

K. Klein 05-19-2012 05:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rocker (Post 496961)
My current favourite though, is Neil Gaiman.

Ever read Good Omens? That's one of my favorite books... written by Pratchett and Gaiman together, and has all the awesomeness of both.

Crowne 05-20-2012 12:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rocker (Post 496961)
For humour I love Pratchett

Pratchett has a specific type of humour you have to either hate or love. If you mildly enjoy it, you won't be able to read through a lot of his stories.
I loved the Hogfather for example, but now that I read more stories by Pratchett, I only find his humour to be... I guess too far fetched or predictable even.
Then again, I believe this goes for any writer's humour. If you read it too much, it gets old. That's why I rarely read "comedy novels".

Andy Mitchell 05-20-2012 06:03 AM

My one is Simon Kernick, he writes tough, gritty stuff that keeps you on the edge on your sent.

Gaines 05-20-2012 06:35 AM

Irving...he can write.

Ollzie 05-20-2012 10:51 AM

At the moment, Charles Dickens. Although, that may just be due to the fact that I am currently reading Oliver Twist...

Rocker 05-20-2012 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by K. Klein (Post 496963)
Ever read Good Omens? That's one of my favorite books... written by Pratchett and Gaiman together, and has all the awesomeness of both.

I have indeed, several years ago. Enjoyed it immensely but the co-authorship with Gaiman didn't really register at the time.
Just recently, someone who was reading through my current project (The Proxy Game, in the Members Forum) recommended a book called 'American Gods' by Neil Gaiman. So I read it, and that's what hooked me...and it was only then I realised the link with Pratchett. Good Omens was definitley a good book...but i would be hard put to tell you who wrote which bits...
FWIW, my favourite TP book was Small Gods. I think I gave up after Feet of Clay.
:D

K. Klein 05-21-2012 11:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rocker (Post 497188)
I have indeed, several years ago. Enjoyed it immensely but the co-authorship with Gaiman didn't really register at the time.
Just recently, someone who was reading through my current project (The Proxy Game, in the Members Forum) recommended a book called 'American Gods' by Neil Gaiman. So I read it, and that's what hooked me...and it was only then I realised the link with Pratchett. Good Omens was definitley a good book...but i would be hard put to tell you who wrote which bits...
FWIW, my favourite TP book was Small Gods. I think I gave up after Feet of Clay.
:D

Small gods was fantastic, I loved that one. I think my other favorites are Witches Abroad and The Hogfather.

choxie 05-21-2012 12:38 PM

My favorite author is Augusten Burroughs. Always has been, ever since he came out with Running with Scissors. He's sharp, witty, hilarious, and strong.

Before that I was obsessed with Stephen King. I read like two books a week. That's probably why I love writing horror. I loved reading something that made me say what the hell...I don't wanna read this but I can't stop. Like in Misery when she puts the log between his legs...ughhh good stuff.

A.r.p. 05-21-2012 05:25 PM

David Foster Wallace, most certainly. I've tried to explain my fascination with his work and I haven't really found the answer yet. It's almost like spending time with someone I'm very deeply connected to, and I know he's just like me in all the important ways, and he's uncannily talented at putting words to all my buried fears and joys. That's some part of why I'm drawn to his work. And I just admire the guy, full out. He was a genius. No hesitation saying that.

ProsperosCell 05-22-2012 12:48 AM

What do you think of Harold Bloom's evaluation on David Foster Wallace: "He can't write and he can't think"?

I admire both of them, but I really think there is something to that statement that actually lends to DFW's interesting qualities. For example, his book Everything and More(a fun read) which is filled with errors and contradictions. Or he writes in the cover of "Suttree" by Cormac McCarthy that the book has a poor introduction. I have yet to meet someone that is genuinely intrigued by Infinite Jest's first few sections (eventually some have overcome the barrier, I started it twice myself.) Yet, that odd self-doubting voice is what characterizes him for me, and makes so many of his essays seem sensible and immediate.

My favorite poetry writer at the moment is Seamus Heaney, I have just recently gotten into him though so my opinion is not fully developed. Its so hard to choose for prose, mainly because I feel farther removed and therefore less apt to choose a specific author to read. I'd say James Joyce, merely because I like all 4 of his main works pretty equally.

A.r.p. 05-22-2012 09:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ProsperosCell (Post 497570)
What do you think of Harold Bloom's evaluation on David Foster Wallace: "He can't write and he can't think"?

DFW has an abrasive style. It's no surprise a lot of people don't take to it.

Quote:

I have yet to meet someone that is genuinely intrigued by Infinite Jest's first few sections
That's me. The first few pages were slow, but I was drawn along by some bizarre peculiar feeling just below the surface of banality. Hal's insanity, I mean. By the end of that section I was hooked. And then the next subject and circumstance -- OCD-level pot smoker in the grips of addiction, trying to smoke himself out forever -- was something I could identify with, having dealt with addiction and unhappiness and spiraling wobbly logic, and the writing here proved so cartoonish and absurd yet still retaining believability somehow that I was tickled to have found this guy DWF, like having just made an hyper-intelligent friend with a great sense of humor, always willing to jest for laughs.

Quote:

I'd say James Joyce, merely because I like all 4 of his main works pretty equally.
Dubliners contains some of the best shorts I've read. Portrait of the Artist, however, has beaten me into submission the last three times I've tried to finish it.

jonparov 05-22-2012 01:29 PM

It used to be Pratchett (another Small Gods, and Good Omens fan here. I also loved The Reaper Man.) but in the last few years it has been Ishiguro. I cannot really explain why, I don't know how he does it (I wish I did - although I have a suspicion its something to do with his use of an unreliable narrator) but his storys draw me in and leave me satisfied, even when i'm not entirely sure what went on (as in the Unconsoled.)

Perhaps I'm subconciously drawn to the themes he writes on. I also like his style, very correct and formal, which I enjoy.

It could be of course that he is simply a great writer.

Just recently I've been very impressed by Will Self.

maxopray 06-01-2012 03:11 AM

Kurt Vonnegut - I think better than anyone he captures how hilariously meaningless it all is.

I've even taken on his fictional religion from Cat's Cradle and become a Bokonist. "Unexpected travel suggestions are like dancing lessons from god."

OberonOrion 06-01-2012 03:47 AM

I'd have to say my favorite author is probably Ted Dekker, though I read so many
books it's really REALLY hard to just pic one author.. :)
I also like Frank Peretti, Christopher Paolini, John Flanagan, Sharon Creech, Emily Rodda, Alan Dean Foster, and Tamora Pierce... :biggrin:

Mike C 06-07-2012 01:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maxopray (Post 499562)
Kurt Vonnegut - I think better than anyone he captures how hilariously meaningless it all is.

Indeed.

I couldn't choose only one. Vonnegut, of course, JG Ballard, Will Self, Orwell, LOVE Margaret Attwood, a comparatively recent dicovery, Aldiss, Moorcock, most of the 'Golden Age' sf writers, the 'New Wave' writers, even the 'New Weird'... I've probably left a dozen or more out.

Ballard had the biggest influence on me as an evolving writer, along with Moorcock, but every single book you read has a greater or lesser impact.

Torsh 06-07-2012 04:50 AM

J.R.R. Tolkien. I just love his stories and his prose.

However my prose is short and fast instead of detailed and descriptive.

Dela Eden 07-12-2012 01:29 AM

My favourite writer is Paul Doherty. His books are absolutely incredible.

MissDragonpoet 07-12-2012 01:36 AM

Hmm...this is tough to answer since i am an avid reader and have read some many different authors from nora roberts to Benard Cornwell and such in-between and in a sense it greatly depends upon the type of book or theme I am currently interested, such as right now, its crimes such as solving murders, which would be JD Robb. However my all time favorites would have to Mary Steward, Marion Zimmer, Andre Norton and Poe. I am doubtful that my writing style mirrors any of theirs, but currently in my writing the theme is more based in real life and in first person. I think that what I do read influences that ideas that come to mind, and influences my writing directions.

Dela Eden 07-12-2012 01:41 AM

If you like Bernard Cornwell I'd seriously recommend Paul Doherty. He's a history writer too, and his books are so vivid. The Canterbury Tales series by him are my favourite, as they're very dark, full of mystery, which you said you like at the moment, and historical, but they're very difficult to find. He's written so much about so many different periods of history, and he writes with a far more adult style than some books, so it's good for vocabulary building too :)


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