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I Hate Modern Medicine

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Old 04-24-2008, 08:11 AM
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Default I Hate Modern Medicine


I hate so-called modern medicine. I'm convinced that people in the future will look back on it as a combination of ignorance, greed and barbarism -- the same way we view snake oil salesmen or doctors who use to drill holes in the heads of crazy people to let the bad spirits out.

The incompetence of doctors nearly killed me twice. I was hospitalized only once in my entire life and it was a nightmare that reminded me of Bedlam, the infamous 18th insane asylum where patients were chained to their beds and subjected to what amounted to torture.

A leg wound became infected and after I experienced chills and fever I went to the emergency room of a hospital because I was afraid the infection had spread to my bloodstream.

I assumed I would be given an injection of anti-biotics and sent home the same day with a prescription for anti-biotic pills to take.

Wrong. As soon as the greedheads realized I had good health insurance, the emergency room doctor insisted on keeping me in a monitoring ward "for a day or two." He explained that my blood pressure and heart rate were higher than normal and he wanted to run tests to find out why.

It seemed obvious to me that a bad leg infection could easily elevate blood pressure and heart rate, but I went along like a fool.

My leg infection was quickly put on the back burner. It was a whole day before I received my first dose of anti-biotics. This struck me as idiocy because it allowed the infection to continue spreading longer than necessary.

I was examined by no less than 5 doctors. This medical committee tried 4 different anti-biotics before they finally settled on Bactrin, which turned out to be the wrong anti-biotic for my type of infection.

Meanwhile, nurses were tripping over each other coming into or leaving my room. They took blood pressure readings and blood samples every four hours, but staggered them so I was set upon every two hours. With all these interruptions I got almost no sleep, which must have have put further stress on my already-weak immune system.

One time, after a nurse woke me up to take my blood pressure, she noted with alarm that it was lower than normal. Was she a complete moron? Whose blood pressure isn't low right after they have been sleeping? I got out of bed, walked around the room for a couple minutes, then had her take my blood pressure again. She was relieved to find it was back to normal.

First too high, then too low, then just right. It was like being trapped in the fairytale "Goldilocks and the Three Bears."

This nonsense stretched into a third day at which point I discovered that none of my doctors had bothered to check the results of my blood culture to find out specifically which bacteria had infected me. After they determined it hadn't spread to my bloodstream, they apparently lost interest in the identity of the pathogen. Why be medically thorough as long as I was in my bed, plugged into a perpetual IV for more tests at any time?

The doctors began hinting they wanted to keep me in hospital for three more days. By this time my leg infection looked much better and both of my arms had large purple patches of blood bruises from amateurish needle pricks.

I got fed up after one nurse retrieved a blood pressure wrap from the floor where it had fallen and wanted to apply it to my arm which had fresh needle wounds. Guess what the number one cause of death is in hospitals? Infections spread by doctors and other staff who fail to sterilize equipment and even forget to wash their hands!

I told my doctors I was checking myself out of the hospital immediately. Their reaction shocked and angered me.

They said I would have to sign a form stating that I was leaving against their advice, which I didn't mind at all. Then they attempted to terrorize me by saying I was risking death from the leg infection -- the same infection they had virtually ignored the first 24 hours before subjecting me to a round of guinea-pig medicine only to select the wrong anti-biotic. Later they refused to help me get my wallet from the hospital safe, where I had been urged to place it since the hospital assumed no responsibility for theft of personal items. Without my money, they knew I couldn't pay for a taxi to get home.

Finally, the doctors refused to give me a prescription for anti-biotics since I was leaving against their advice. I told them where they could stick their prescription and left after I got my wallet a few hours later.

I felt as if I had escaped from a prison or madhouse. And lucky to be young enough to defend myself. Among other horrors, I witnessed a blatant case of elderly abuse by a greasy-haired young doctor. If he had treated me that way, he would have had blood in his hair as well as grease.

I asked my personal doctor to write me a prescription for anti-biotics. Predictably, he balked at first, saying he wanted to see my hospital test results before deciding what drug to prescribe. I told him to fax the hospital after I learned it would take DAYS to get my medical records snail-mailed to him.

It was all about money. I was a cash cow to my doctors as long as they could keep running useless tests and charge my insurance company several hundred dollars a day for a hospital bed. I decided I would only allow myself to be treated on an out-patient basis from that point on. I'll put up with all the tests and treatments, but I'm going home at the end of the day. No more Bedlam for me.

A recent newspaper article I read disclosed that only 31 percent of doctors permit e-mail communication from their patients for non-emergency matters like scheduling office visits or asking advice on general health issues.

The American Medical Association warns that e-mail should not replace face-to-face time with patients.

The AMA refers to the very few minutes a typical doctor actually spends in the examination room with each patient after making them wait for ten times that long like cattle in two separate holding pens. It should be called assembly-line medicine because doctors schedule as many patients as possible into every hour to make the most money and they have to keep the line moving as quickly as possible.

It's not the first time the medical field has been slow to embrace technology. When the first telephones became widely available in the late 19th, doctors were reluctant to use them.

"Medicine is very conservative," Dr. Tom Delbanco was quoted as saying. "It changes slowly."

That was quite an understatement. "Modern" medicine is still based on a 300-year-old model of the human body as a machine composed of quasi-independent fixable or removable parts rather than the mind/body/spirit holistic model. The healthcare industry has yet to apply the principles of 80-year-old quantum theory to medical treatment, even though the electronic tools they use wouldn't work if quantum physics wasn't the most verified theory in the history of science.

Doctors aren't healers anymore. They're medical entrepreneurs who are often financially invested in the laboratories where they send their patients' blood samples and other tests. They're also shills for the pharmaceutical industry, passing out questionable prescription drugs like candy in exchange for expensive vacations and other favors.

The only honest doctor I ever knew was engaged to marry a good friend of mine. She told me to stay away from doctors unless I was convinced I was dying. I never forgot her warning.

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Old 04-24-2008, 12:42 PM
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Well on this side of the pond hospitals are funded by the government (well the tax payer) but it does mean that hospital and doctors earnings are limited and related to how well and quickly they can cure there patient, and how efficiently. One of the few time that I can remember going to the hospital I was in and out of the operating theatre within about 7 hours of breaking my limb, and that includes the time waiting for the ambulance and getting to the hospital (about 40 min drive). Considering that the break was clean and I was in no pain, and the fact that I hat eaten moments before the accident and as such could not be but under anaesthesia for the operation due to full stomach they where quit efficient.

Then again this was a while ago and I don’t know how it is today. Hopefully not as bad as commercial health care as over there but probably not as good as it was.

As for private clinics, I have no idea.

You say you nearly died twice, what where the cases if one may ask.
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Old 04-24-2008, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Tau Worlock View Post
You say you nearly died twice, what were the cases if one may ask.
The first time my Big Island doctor placed me on a daily dose of aspirin as a preventative measure against heart attack/stroke simply because I had turned 50 years old, even though I had lower than normal blood pressure and cholesterol. He not only got the dosage wrong (triple the recommended amount), he failed to test me for blood platelet count. Aspirin causes internal bleeding if you don't have a sufficient amount of platelets and I nearly bled to death one night.

The second time my Honolulu doctor misdiagnosed me with flu instead of dengue fever, even though I knew I had dengue symptoms from an account provided by a friend who caught dengue in the South Pacific. My idiot doctor argued I couldn't have dengue because (1) I didn't have a rash (2)there hadn't been a dengue outbreak in Hawaii for half a century.

Turns out dengue rashes only happen in children and not always in adults. And weeks after I went to the doctor hundreds of Hawaii residents had dengue fever. I had excruciating joint pain and I was so out of my head with fever, I took the ASPIRIN! my doctor gave me. In addition to the blood platelet issue, aspirin should never be taken by dengue victims because it can cause permanent liver, kidney and brain damage. I was deathly sick for an entire month because of the misdiagnosis.
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Old 04-24-2008, 02:49 PM
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I think your gripe might be less against modern medicine than the invasion of insurance into just about every aspect of Western life. There is so much fear about malpractice and lawsuits that second, third, and fourth opinions are sought. Bearing in mind that a doctor can lose his career, something that required many years and even more dollars to achieve, this sort of over-cautious behaviour doesn't seem so outrageous. Of course, that does not account for any errors made in your care. But you are still here, even if only to complain.

The one time I had scepticaemia (she said, as though everyone had it at least once), it had reached the point that I could not wait even one day for the antibiotics to do their business. I was dealt with quickly and efficiently, but that was back in the 1970s. Now, a doctor wouldn't touch me without first running a raft of tests - and a quick consultation with his lawyer/solicitor. Had my then doctor waited, I might not be here now. (Bad luck for you lot, that he took the risk. )

I'm very much in favour of modern medical advances, even if they did try to kill me fourteen years ago. (But, having been a neglected child, it was very exciting to see the crash cart and all those people fussing over me. )
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Old 04-24-2008, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Queen of Wands View Post
Of course, that does not account for any errors made in your care. But you are still here, even if only to complain.
Yes, I am, but not because of the dangerously incompetent doctors who treated me.

Originally Posted by Queen of Wands View Post
I'm very much in favour of modern medical advances ...
The main tool of modern medicine is anti-biotics, which are beginning not to work because of overuse in humans and the farm animals we eat. Some 3,000 years ago people who survived childhood lived "three score and ten" (70) years -- the same average lifespan of today -- without modern medicine.
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Old 04-24-2008, 03:14 PM
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You probably know better than I do, but the average lilfespan was greatly shortened between then and now. How would you explain that? Not arguing with you here, just asking a question. I know you studied anthropology.
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Old 04-24-2008, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Queen of Wands View Post
You probably know better than I do, but the average lilfespan was greatly shortened between then and now. How would you explain that?
Most ancient empires were militaristic and involved in constant warfare, which is why the men had shorter lifespans. But most of the women lived as long as modern women.

My point is longevity is mainly in our genes, not in a doctor's bag of tricks.
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Old 04-25-2008, 01:55 AM
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Point taken. During the Middle Ages, however, lifespans were definitely shorter, for men and women, though. But I suppose this was owing to poor health and a hard life. And, of course, we need to bear in mind that there is a correlation between wealth and health, and ever has been.
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Old 07-21-2016, 04:50 AM
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Default modern medicine cherokee

modern medicine
I'm not a fan of modern medicine either
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Old 07-27-2016, 10:24 AM
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You can search the height and depth
but no matter what you said or do
there is no cure for the common death.
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