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Do you need an editor when you self-publish on eBooks?

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  #31  
Old 04-30-2014, 05:35 PM
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I do not simply "profess" to be an editor. I am professionally trained (by a university as well as other professional editors), and I resent the implication that because I simply made an error (while trying to be helpful to another member), I am somehow not what I claim to be.

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  #32  
Old 05-01-2014, 02:57 AM
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I didn't say you weren't what you claimed to be. I suggested that a little more care in your posting would demonstrate your professionalism and stop people like me taking cheap shots.
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  #33  
Old 05-01-2014, 04:38 AM
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Profess: "to say that you are, do, or feel something when other people doubt what you say".

I am not responsible for your cheap shot. You are. And I did put quite a bit of care into my response. Because I did not paragraph enough in a post, in my opinion, does not mean I am not professional.
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  #34  
Old 05-01-2014, 08:28 AM
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No point getting your knickers in a twist. You have your opinion, I have mine. No point getting upset if there's a difference.
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  #35  
Old 06-25-2014, 03:31 PM
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I usually edit my own and proof read. After twenty years of writing I find I am quite good at it. It is just a matter of going through the work over and over.
The thing with editors, you can learn a lot from the exercise of following their advice and it increases your skills. On my last I payed an editor and still didn't get published. Much praise from agents and publishers for my work. The Booker Prize winner's book happened to come out at the same time and it was a similar story, so they didn't run with mine.
Trouble is no work will be published unless it is skillfull writing and finished to a high degree in these times of such huge supply of hopeful writers.
All the best from Medini Summers.
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  #36  
Old 06-29-2014, 09:26 PM
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The editor must be there, if you are doing it by profession. Always your books should error less and completely fine tune. Some times professional editors help you to rich sell your ebooks by having much ideas even they can better judge the readers market.

Also I am completely agree with flyingtart, because some time that types ideas take you next level and worthy, else you can choose any of your nearer.

Thank you
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  #37  
Old 07-17-2014, 09:31 AM
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I'd say having someone else go through for obvious errors at a minimum is a necessity. There is nothing worse than trying to read a book and getting irritated at minor spelling mistakes that were missed simply because the author was too familiar with the text to notice them.
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  #38  
Old 07-19-2014, 07:58 AM
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Default Do you need an editor when you self-publish on eBooks

I doubt you should pay an editor when working with eBooks.

But, it depends on who you talk to.
Do you have a site in mind?
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  #39  
Old 07-21-2014, 05:51 AM
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Just do it yourself. Read the whole thing backwords from the end for better results.
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  #40  
Old 08-07-2014, 06:27 AM
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To be honest, I have not always been very impressed with the editing done by publishers (of journals and volumes) before. I now make sure I get as much editing done as I possibly can before turning in my work.

My personal tactic is to send pieces of the work (or the entire work) to several friends. Some are writers too, some have relevant experience, others are merely interested in the subject matter. That way, I get a range of opinions and everyone may catch different things. We do these things for each other for free and this way we've built a little network. In my experience, this is a really good first step in cleaning up your text, and if you do not have a publisher or editor it's better than nothing!
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  #41  
Old 10-04-2014, 11:20 AM
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In my opnion you don't need one. I have seen so many ebooks without an editor
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  #42  
Old 10-04-2014, 02:58 PM
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I'm presently editing work, some of which has been out there 25 years or more. Some of it was edited by "professional" editors. The later ones, by me.
Professional editors can help with mechanics. If you have a spellcheck and follow some of the "rules" of writing, it can be done without help. Commas are a pain. I've learned, when in doubt, leave them out. Don't worry about colons or semicolons - use dashes.
Put the work away and do something else. Come back to it after a month or so and read it. You will have learned a thing or two in the meantime and will see mistakes.
The great thing about self-published eBooks is that you can. on most sites. upload a new version at any time.
My major earlier mistake was using too many speaker designations (He said. She replied. Don threw in. etc.) If there are two people talking for two or three pages, they get tedious. You don't need them, and you don't need them with a distinctive speaker. If there is only one with a French accent, you don't need to designate it was her who said, "I am Veree Sorre, Mon Ami." Your reader will know who said it.
These are the things that turn off readers. The collector's edition are already getting comments mentioning that they are better reads than the originals.
In other words, a very basic content editor might prove a good thing, but do the mechanical parts yourself.
The overall answer from me would be - No.
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  #43  
Old 10-13-2014, 12:30 AM
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I doubt you should pay an editor when working with eBooks.
If you want to release a project with (possibly) still a plethora of errors in it, sure. As writers, we're too close to our work and end up missing a lot of things, or logical angles that we might not have considered. Plus, we read what we'd meant to write (mechanically), not what's actually there. An editor can prove to be very useful in those cases.

During content work, with a solid background of the writing craft and its ins and outs, an editor can bring so much more to the table than a beta reader could (although, betas can be a wonderful choice for those who can't afford an editor). With mechanics, well . . . again, as writers, we can miss so much that an editor's trained eye would be able to pick up on and fix.

Can you do it yourself? Sure, if you'd like. Honestly, though, I've been an editor for years, and I still hire other editors to line edit and proofread for my own works, again (again) because we miss far too much.

Don't do yourselves or your works a disservice. Find a good editor who'll work with you, project-wise and payment-wise.
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  #44  
Old 10-21-2014, 04:48 AM
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Exactly my experience. You miss too much. You are a professional editor who admits that.
Your first few works should have an editor of some sort. I had an editor from the publishing company work with me on my first sale. Later, when I reread that piece of garbage, I found it was better (but never deserving of being printed) before he edited it.
You have programs to handle most of the mechanics. I find that homonyms are the hardest to detect with those programs, so do a search of the ones you've used to be certain you haven't used "you're" for "your" and "to" for "too" etc.
If the story is done well, the flow and tempo are what you want, the style is consistent, go for it! As stated above, you can "upload a new version" on most sites when you discover mistakes.
Mistakes are a part of life. You WILL make them. Correct those you can and move on.
Best of luck!
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  #45  
Old 11-10-2014, 12:21 PM
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This will depend entirely on the policy of the publisher and your personal preferences. For most publishing platforms, it is not necessary to hire an editor for self-published work.
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  #46  
Old 09-22-2015, 09:41 AM
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I would suggest finding another writer of similar genre to swap editing with. Or perhaps a high school English teacher looking to earn some extra $$.
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  #47  
Old 09-22-2015, 03:18 PM
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I guess the writers with the real problem are the ones who need an editor but don't think they do.

Bummer.
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  #48  
Old 09-22-2015, 03:40 PM
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That actually is a real bummer, Binx. I've read some very promising stories -- well, tried to read them, but because of the structural mess, I couldn't wade through it with enough force to really enjoy the story itself. I could sense there was a good underlying story, but it needed a lot of work.

And it is those who don't think they need an editor and just decide throwing "whatever" out there to see if it'll fly is a great idea (not!) . . . that's what hurts us indie authors. We need to raise the bar by encouraging indies to build a good team (betas, editor, formatter, cover artist, etc.) who'll all work with the author to turn out the best potential product. Takes work, and many people are too impatient to go through all of the necessary steps.
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  #49  
Old 09-22-2015, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Devon View Post
If you want to release a project with (possibly) still a plethora of errors in it, sure. As writers, we're too close to our work and end up missing a lot of things, or logical angles that we might not have considered. Plus, we read what we'd meant to write (mechanically), not what's actually there. An editor can prove to be very useful in those cases.

During content work, with a solid background of the writing craft and its ins and outs, an editor can bring so much more to the table than a beta reader could (although, betas can be a wonderful choice for those who can't afford an editor). With mechanics, well . . . again, as writers, we can miss so much that an editor's trained eye would be able to pick up on and fix.

Can you do it yourself? Sure, if you'd like. Honestly, though, I've been an editor for years, and I still hire other editors to line edit and proofread for my own works, again (again) because we miss far too much.

Don't do yourselves or your works a disservice. Find a good editor who'll work with you, project-wise and payment-wise.

This is exceptionally true. I am a master at typos and content editing of others' work, but when it comes to my own, I miss the stupidest shit. It's almost like you know what you meant to say, and so, that's how you read it, even if it's wrong. :-(

Sometimes following the movie in your head can be a detriment to precision, while being a boon to creativity.

Always hire an editor. Always.

There are editors who will whip through a novel for less than $500... I can't see how it would not be worth the money in future sales to put up a superbly cleaner version of your art.
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  #50  
Old 09-22-2015, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Devon View Post
That actually is a real bummer, Binx.
I know. I wasn't really joking. But sometimes brevity is the soul of wit.

I've read or tried to read many self-published novels. Some were good, but it's not hard to see how the impatient authors or the ones who don't know any better make it difficult for the people who go for quality. One blogger I read referred to all the self-published novels out there as a "sh*t volcano."

Frankly, unless I know the author, or the book comes highly recommended from someone who's opinion I value, it's just an easier and a safer bet to go with something traditionally published. I only have so much time to read.
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  #51  
Old 09-22-2015, 07:25 PM
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After having been published by a traditional publisher and using their editor and proofreader, I would break the bank to ensure my book was professionally edited if I ever self-publish.

I thought my novel was in good editorial shape after being revised and rewritten over a number of years, but the number of errors picked up during their several run-throughs was alarming.

I very much took to heart the words of the editor, who said: An author should not edit his own work, as he sees what he meant and not what he wrote.
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  #52  
Old 09-23-2015, 04:05 AM
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Originally Posted by SteveHarrison View Post
I very much took to heart the words of the editor, who said: An author should not edit his own work, as he sees what he meant and not what he wrote.
Wow, fantastically said. The great writer is one who can get beyond what they meant. So fucking hard though.
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  #53  
Old 09-23-2015, 07:37 AM
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Hi brian. How's the work coming?

If I had my way, I would put an editor on retainer, pay them more than they want, and have them pass on everything I wrote, including this post.

A personal experience: When I wrote MovieMind for Screenwriters, I saved my money to publish it as a POD at Lightening Source. I planned to sell it on Amazon.

My youngest son, also named Brian, had a better education than me, and suggested I hire an editor before freezing the textbook in print, where it would be harder to change any boo boos.

So I approached hiring a cyber editor just like hiring a crew member for movie project. Finally I chose one and MovieMind was out of my hands for a couple of months. When it came back to me I was floored. I had so many misunderstandings, grammar and spelling errors that I almost gave up on ever wrrting again.

So I did a "polish" rewrite. Some members of my support team, who knew the movie industry, also read it and suggestions.

In the end, Brian read it again, and came up witih a few mistakes that not one person caught.
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  #54  
Old 09-23-2015, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by wrc View Post
Hi brian. How's the work coming?

If I had my way, I would put an editor on retainer, pay them more than they want, and have them pass on everything I wrote, including this post.

A personal experience: When I wrote MovieMind for Screenwriters, I saved my money to publish it as a POD at Lightening Source. I planned to sell it on Amazon.

My youngest son, also named Brian, had a better education than me, and suggested I hire an editor before freezing the textbook in print, where it would be harder to change any boo boos.

So I approached hiring a cyber editor just like hiring a crew member for movie project. Finally I chose one and MovieMind was out of my hands for a couple of months. When it came back to me I was floored. I had so many misunderstandings, grammar and spelling errors that I almost gave up on ever wrrting again.

So I did a "polish" rewrite. Some members of my support team, who knew the movie industry, also read it and suggestions.

In the end, Brian read it again, and came up witih a few mistakes that not one person caught.

Do you mean your son Brian?
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  #55  
Old 09-23-2015, 10:31 AM
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An author should not edit his own work, as he sees what he meant and not what he wrote.
Oh . . . is that ever true!!
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  #56  
Old 09-23-2015, 11:01 AM
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yes. My son Brian.
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Old 02-04-2016, 04:24 PM
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I have a good friend who likes to read and write, and she takes a look at my book when I have finished the first, like, 30 edits of my own, and she ALWAYS finds things I have totally overlooked and I am so thankful for her help. I usually send her some money to say thank you, whatever I can afford. Then when I submit it somewhere, it at least makes sense.
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Old 02-04-2016, 04:25 PM
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I have a friend who reads my manuscripts before I submit them, after I've finished editing them many times, and she always finds things I've missed, important things. Now, from what you've all said, I guess she is what is called a beta reader! Now I know what a beta reader is! And all this time, I've had one!
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Old 02-05-2016, 08:09 AM
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An old adage about being a 'writer'.

You can consider yourself a 'writer' after you've written over 1 Million words.

By then if you reread what you've written, you're a pretty good editor as well.
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