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Tibetan Book of the Dead

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Old 05-08-2007, 04:33 AM
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Default Tibetan Book of the Dead


On the History channel last night I saw an episode about The Tibetan Book of the Dead which reminded me that the older I get, the more I regret how Buddhism lost its original wisdom over time.

Of the four Noble Truths taught by Buddha, the most important is the realization that the only way for humans to to end their suffering is to stop clutching at transitory things. Individual human life and consciousness are both transitory -- they change and eventually end.

Yet The Tibetan Book of the Dead seems to be a desperate form of clutching to both life (after death) and consciousness.

The book is an integral part of Tantric Buddhism, a sect that developed in Tibet after Buddhism arrived from India two millenia ago. Normally, I would welcome any religious sect that views wild and guilt-free sex as one legitimate path to spiritual enlightenment, which Tantra does. But this path is strewn with goblins and other things that go bump in the night.

The human mind has one glaring flaw that causes endless problems: it is capable of posing questions for which there is no real answer.

We know consciousness ceases at death. We have machines that measure consciousness and record the point at which it stops. Yet most of us ask unanswerable questions like:

What happens my awareness after I am no longer aware of anything?

Where do I go after death and what do I see there?

Both questions ignore the fact that there is no "I" without consciousness.

To some degree, this nonsense is understandable. Consciousness is the only viable frame of reference we have ever experienced and we can't imagine existing without it. Because non-existence arouses great fear, we invent a myriad of fairy tales to explain the unexplainable. We picture heaven or paradise or Allah's garden and this helps us to get through bad nights when we cannot sleep.

The Tibetan Book of the Dead is one such fairy tale, but like hell, it's not very comforting. The book is divided into bardos or compartments of death filled with demons and other perils. A bardo sounds like an idea George Romero rejected for a movie -- "Demon Realm of the Dead."

Most religions take advantage of our natural fear of death to leverage their influence in our lives. In response to this, I fall back on a piece of secular wisdom I learned a long time ago. We have nothing to fear but fear itself.

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Old 05-08-2007, 05:16 AM
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The thing I learned about Tantra is that the sex isn't quite what people think it is. In Tantra, sex is one way to achieve enlightment or help you strive towards it.

It can get pretty dark, too. There are some practices in Tantra that I won't even mention. Think of it this way--some practitioners of Tantra deliberately put themselves in horrifying scenarios to challenge themselves to stay focused and meditating. I won't even go beyond that explanation, but just imagine your worst sexual nightmare.

I've never practiced Tantra, just read about it. But some of the things I discovered put me off of it completely. I guess every religion has its zealots and I'm sure not all of Tantra is like what I read.

Anyway, as far as the ever-after--I haven't made up my mind yet. But, one thing I like to think about is good old-fashioned science: Energy is neither created nor destroyed; it merely changes form.

Incinerate my remains and pile them around some giant tree. If all else fails, I can become nourishment.
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