WritersBeat.com
 

Go Back   WritersBeat.com > Writing Craft > Tips & Advice

Tips & Advice What works for you? Share your experience!


Tip of the Day

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #31  
Old 04-23-2006, 11:11 PM
Perfect_Paradox's Avatar
Perfect_Paradox (Offline)
Better than Darth.
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,146
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Send a message via AIM to Perfect_Paradox
Default


haha, i'm a blonde as well. It's actually a great thing, see, because whenever I do anything stupid I can blame it on my hair and everyone accepts it!
mwahahahaha.

And i'm sure plenty of people get their stories from dreams Mine are either too obscure to remember, or involve people and situations from real life - so a bit hard to write about. But I think I might start keeping a dream journal, it'd be very interesting, and I might get something out of it.

Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 04-23-2006, 11:15 PM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

Wow, we made this two pages... Interesting. I blamed everything on my hair, my stupidity, my writing, the weather. It was fun.

I know a few others that can get things from their dreams, but not many can remember them. My girlfriend says she only remembers a few dreams, and whenever I ask, suprisingly enough, they're about us. I remember all my writings, dreams of her, and nightmares. The nightmare ones usually are the ones that beat me up, because those are the ones you want to forget....but never seem to leave.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 04-24-2006, 09:20 PM
Perfect_Paradox's Avatar
Perfect_Paradox (Offline)
Better than Darth.
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,146
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Send a message via AIM to Perfect_Paradox
Default

Originally Posted by Oasis Writer
The nightmare ones usually are the ones that beat me up, because those are the ones you want to forget....but never seem to leave.
I know! I still remember nightmares that I had when I was 7 years old, sheesh. Maybe I should write something on it....
And I should start blaming the weather on my hair also - it makes the most sense, anyways. hahaha.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 04-24-2006, 09:52 PM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

I agree. My nightmares are a little bit...different I guess...lots of people have them I guess, but mine are of losing someone.

And yeah, trust me, you blame the weather on your hair once, and you'll instantly be popular.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 04-24-2006, 09:55 PM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

I'm going to be busy tomorrow, and it's hour before midnight, but here ya go.
Not the best, but helps with a simple task. Here ya go.

April 25, 2006


CAPITALIZATION - RANK/TITLE



Capitalize a person's title when it precedes the name. Do not capitalize when the title is acting as a description following the name



EXAMPLE

Director Williams

Captain Courtain
Max Williams, the director of the Oregon Department of Corrections, will address us at noon.

Mr. Cain, the institution security manager, will lead the discussion.



Capitalize when the person's title follows the name on the address or signature line.



EXAMPLE



Sincerely,
Ms. Coleman, Education Manager



Capitalize the titles of high-ranking government officials when used with or before their names. Do not capitalize the civil title if it is used instead of the name.



EXAMPLE



The governor will address the citizens.
The superintendent has scheduled the employees’ annual meeting for February.
All senators are expected to attend.
The superintendent and assistant superintendent called for an investigation.
Oregon’s Governor Kulongoski, Idaho’s Governor Dirk Kempthorne, and Lieutenant Governor Jim Risch will attend the conference.



EXAMPLE



Capitalize any title when used as a direct address.



Will you sign my report, Captain?
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 04-26-2006, 09:21 AM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

Not the best, but helps with a simple task. Here ya go.

April 26, 2006

Power Tools for Emphasis and Conciseness



ACTIVE AND PASSIVE VOICE

"




The term voice refers to the relationship of the subject and its verb. In the active voice, the subject acts or performs the action. (The subject is the doer.) In the passive voice, the subject is acted upon or receives the action. (The subject is not the doer of the action.)



Active Voice

In the active voice, the subject is the doer of the action.

The Assistant Superintendent wrote the report.

(The subject, Assistant Superintendent, performs the main action and is positioned directly before the verb to emphasize clearly who is performing the action.)



Passive Voice

In the passive voice, the subject is not the doer of the action.

The report was written by the Assistant Superintendent.

(The subject, report, is not the doer of the action. The relationship of the doer to the action is not as clear because the doer, Assistant Superintendent, is not placed directly before the verb. In fact, it is separated from and follows the verb, reducing the readability.)



Structure your writing to emphasize or de-emphasize by using active or passive voice to your advantage. This increases your ability to achieve the reader impact you desire.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 04-27-2006, 09:06 AM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

Not the best, but helps with a simple task. Here ya go.

April 27, 2006

POWER TOOLS FOR EMPHASIS AND CONCISENESS



Use of Active and Passive



Readability experts agree that active voice is usually the best choice because it is easier to comprehend than passive voice. The relationship between subject and verb is clearer in the active voice, which adds force and momentum to a message. However, some messages are communicated better in the passive voice. The individual uses and benefits of both the active and the passive voice are explained below.



The active voice has energy.
Writers often use passive voice when active voice would serve their needs better.
The active voice uses a clearly identified doer of the action. This style is easy to read, is shorter, and is more interesting to read because it emphasizes people rather than objects.
The active voice is preferable for emphasizing or drawing attention to the doer in a positive situation.


USES AND BENEFITS OF ACTIVE VOICE

(Emphasizes the doer of the action)

1. Emphasis on the doer of the action

2. More concise

3. Increased clarity

4. Easier to read

5. More interesting



The passive voice is preferable in some cases, and good writers use it to advantage to communicate some types of messages.
The passive voice serves to de-emphasize rather than emphasize. It typi*cally emphasizes the object rather than the doer of the action.
The passive voice must be used when the doer is unknown because in the active voice, the subject is the doer of the action.
Passive voice can be useful when you want to soften the effect of bad news, de-emphasize poor performance, or de-emphasize a negative situation.
The passive voice is also used to add variety when the active voice has been used too repetitively.


USES AND BENEFITS OF PASSIVE VOICE

(De-emphasizes the doer of the action)

1. To de-emphasize the doer of negative action

2. To emphasize the object, not the doer

3. To break up repetitive use of active voice

4. To present content when the doer is unimportant or unknown



Active or passive? Your objective determines the choice. In some cases, you will want to emphasize the doer of the action; in others, you will want to emphasize the object receiving the action. Review the following examples:



Active: The accountants compute the totals.

Passive: The totals are computed by the accountants.

In the active voice example, the emphasis is placed on the people who computed the totals

(the accountants). In the passive voice example, the emphasis is placed on the totals, not on the people who computed them. Both constructions are grammatically correct.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 04-28-2006, 10:14 AM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

Pronouns
Some personal pronouns are called possessives because they show whose something is. They are the following pronouns: my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, their, and theirs. An example would be, The money is mine. Mine tells whose money it is.

Find the possessive pronouns in the following sentences.
1. The new car is his.
2. Yours will be here tomorrow.
3. I like theirs best.
4. Should we go for a ride in his or her car.

--For answers scroll down.











Answers:
1. his
2. yours
3. theirs
4. his, hers


Pronouns
The personal pronouns myself, yourself, yourselves, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, and themselves are compound personal pronouns combining the personal pronoun with self or selves. They are used as reflexive pronouns . Carl hurt himself is an example of a reflexive pronoun.

Find the reflexive pronouns in these sentences. What noun or pronoun does the reflexive pronoun refer to in the sentence?

1. I should understand myself better.
2. Ann bought herself two new hamsters.
3. They can't help themselves.
4. The boy cut himself on the broken glass.

--For answers scroll down.
















Answers:
1. myself ......refers to "I"
2. herself .... Refers to "Ann"
3. themselves ..... Refers to "They"
4. himself .... Refers to "boy"


Parts of the Sentence - Pronouns

Pronouns take the place of nouns. Personal pronouns have what is called case. Case means that a different form of a pronoun is used for different parts of the sentence. There are three cases: nominative, objective, possessive.

1) Nominative case pronouns are I, she, he, we, they, and who. They are used as subjects, predicate nominatives, and appositives when used with a subject or predicate nominative.

2) Objective case pronouns are me, her, him, us, them, and whom. They are used as direct objects, indirect objects, objects of the preposition, and appositives when used with one of the objects. You and it are both nominative and objective case.

3) Possessive case pronouns are my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, your, yours, their and theirs. They are used to show ownership.

Possessive pronouns never have apostrophes, but possessive nouns do. Do not confuse the possessive personal pronouns its, your, and their with the contractions it's (it is, it has), you're (you are), and they're (they are).

Choose the correct form of the pronoun.

1. Our dog wagged (its, it's) tail for dinner.

2. (Your, You're) answer is right.

3. (Its, It's) been foggy all week.

4. This is (their, they're) first win.

5. (Your, You're) here on time!

Scroll for answers









Answers

1. its

2. your

3. it's (it has)

4. their

5. you're (you are)
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 04-29-2006, 12:14 AM
Perfect_Paradox's Avatar
Perfect_Paradox (Offline)
Better than Darth.
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,146
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Send a message via AIM to Perfect_Paradox
Default

April 29
Tip brought to you by: Aprilrain

Confused about when to use pronouns when multiple people are involved?

Ex: Lisa brought a snack for him and me vs. Lisa brought a snack for he and I (or some combination of the two).

The best way to figure it out is to think of them as two separate sentences. You would say Lisa brought a snack for him; and Lisa brought a snack for me. So you should use those pronouns if they are coupled together.

Ex: "Tony and me went to the movies." If you separated the two subjects, you wouldn't see "Me went to the movies." Therefore, "I" is correct.

Similarly, in a sentence like: Chris runs faster than he/him, the determination can be made by supplying the implied verb to the end of the sentence. Therefore, "he" would be correct, because you would say "Chris runs faster than he (runs)."
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 06-09-2006, 08:11 PM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

Adverbs

Adverbs can be confusing; so, we will complete a few more lessons before moving on to other grammar tips. We need to memorize what adverbs tell us and what they modify. We must always remember this basic information to handle them correctly.

  • · Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs.
    · Adverbs tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why.
    · Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb.
    · Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify.

Examples:
He kicked the ball solidly. (how)
He kicked the ball immediately. (when)
He kicked the ball forward. (where)
He kicked the ball too hard. (how much).

Instructions: The following sentences have adverbs that tell us how, and they modify the verb. Find the adverbs in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. Joe was frantically mumbling to the 911 operator.

2. The message was secretly hidden in the cushion.

3. The room was decorated beautifully for the wedding.

4. The spy readily accepted the new assignment.

5. He was carefully disguised but captured quickly by police.


--For answers scroll down.


















Answers:

1. frantically modifying the verb was mumbling

2. secretly modifying the verb was hidden

3. beautifully modifying the verb was decorated

4. readily modifying the verb accepted

5. carefully modifying the verb was disguised and quickly modifying the verb was captured (was is a helping verb to both main verbs)
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 06-09-2006, 11:56 PM
Anarkos's Avatar
Anarkos (Offline)
Pencil pusher
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 20
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default

Isn't the general answer for adverbs just plain "don't"?
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 06-10-2006, 12:09 AM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

You would have a very dull story then, because adverbs describe the actions, and verbs, just like adjectives describe the nouns. They're needed to make any good story.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 06-10-2006, 01:36 AM
Anarkos's Avatar
Anarkos (Offline)
Pencil pusher
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 20
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default

You are right that they should not be abandoned altogether. However, just like passive voice, telling not showing and many other elements of the English language, most novice writers tend to over-use them horribly. They are often used to add depth to a colourless and generic verb (eg "spoke loudly") or plain redundant (eg "yelled loudly") or otherwise simply painful.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 08-24-2006, 02:57 AM
DFischer's Avatar
DFischer (Offline)
Got Fisch?
Official Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Hollywood
Posts: 2,709
Thanks: 0
Thanks 168
Send a message via AIM to DFischer
Default

Anyone have some more tips?
__________________
Founder:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Personal site:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Please critique other's work before asking to get critique on your own.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 08-24-2006, 11:07 AM
starrwriter's Avatar
starrwriter (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 4,280
Thanks: 0
Thanks 4
Default

Originally Posted by DFischer
Anyone have some more tips?
Never draw to an inside straight in a poker game.

Wait ... You mean about writing.

Never mind.
__________________
"The earth was made round so we can't see too far down the road and know what is coming." -- Isak Dinesen, Out of Africa
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 08-24-2006, 01:32 PM
Perfect_Paradox's Avatar
Perfect_Paradox (Offline)
Better than Darth.
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,146
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Send a message via AIM to Perfect_Paradox
Default

hmm... when I get back from New York I'm going to try and revive this thread. I think we have enough people on this site to actually make it work now, hahaha.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 08-24-2006, 02:52 PM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

I'll work on it as well now.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 09-11-2006, 07:07 PM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

ERROR-PROOFING OUR WRITING
Comma Splices
  • · Careful writers cringe when they see a comma between two sentences. This error, called a "comma splice," is one of the most serious errors a writer can make.
    · A comma splice can easily be corrected using one of these four methods:
      • 1) Add an end punctuation mark (period, question mark, or exclamation point). Capitalize the first letter of the first word following the end punctuation mark.
        2) Remove the “,” and insert a semicolon.
        3) Add a semicolon, a conjunctive adverb, and a comma.
        4) Leave the comma, and add a conjunction.
Example:
Comma Splice: Thanks for working today, I really appreciate your dedication.
You have four options available to correct the comma splice.
    • 1) Thanks for working today. I really appreciate your dedication.
      2) Thanks for working today; I really appreciate your dedication.
      3) Thanks for working today; indeed, I really appreciate your dedication.
      4) Thanks for working today, and I really appreciate your dedication.
Conjunctive Adverbs
  • · Conjunctive adverbs are not true conjunctions, but these adverbs often function as conjunctions in joining two independent clauses.
    · They serve as transitional devices between one main thought and another.
    · Common Conjunctive Adverbs: accordingly, afterwards, also, consequently, however, indeed, likewise, moreover, nevertheless, nonetheless, so, otherwise, similarly, still, therefore....
Rewrite the below comma splice using the four above-identified methods.
COMMA SPLICE: The boss arrived late, she blamed her tardiness on car trouble
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 09-12-2006, 11:59 AM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

Error-PROOFING OUR writing


Occasionally, we may be able to bluff our way through discussions on a number of topics, but we can't fake it when we're writing. People who know the language will expect us to consistently use it correctly. Coworkers, supervisors and others we respect read what is written. They expect our work to be error free. A bad impression can prevent people from respecting us, taking us seriously, and yes even promoting us! Remember, with today’s technology, if it’s in writing, it can be viewed by innumerous individuals, and it can last several lifetimes!

Today we will review some previously discussed topics because some errors continue to occur in writing and in conversation. To paraphrase Dr. Stephen Covey in The 8th Habit - From Effectiveness to Greatness, “If you don’t practice or teach what has been taught to you, you will soon lose that information.”


redundancies
  • Redundancies occur when one word con­tains part of the idea expressed in another word or term. Example: "revert back”. Revert means "to go back in action, thought, speech, etc." Therefore, the word back is redundant.
  • Redundancies do not add emphasis, as some people think; they merely serve to mark a writer as inexperienced. Here are some commonly used redundancies:
    • basic fundamentals (fundamentals)
    • close proximity (proximity)
    • completely full (full)
    • consensus of opinion (consensus)
    • continue on (continue)
    • cooperate together (cooperate)
    • end result (result)
    • first began (began)
    • foreign imports (imports)
    • future prospects (prospects)
    • many in number (many)
    • new innovation (innovation)
    • other alternative (alternative)
    • past experience (experience)
    • present incumbent (incumbent)
    • postpone until later (postpone)
    • sufficient enough (sufficient)
    • transition back to the community (transition to the community)
    • true facts (facts)
This list is by far, not complete, so feel free to share others
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by Oasis Writer; 09-12-2006 at 12:02 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 09-25-2006, 10:19 PM
Oasis Writer's Avatar
Oasis Writer (Offline)
A Crimson Evanescence
Loyal Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,361
Thanks: 0
Thanks 20
Default

Conjunctive adverbs are typically misused; accordingly, the result is a run-on sentence.
ADVERBS - CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS

1.Conjunctive adverbs are not true conjunctions (connecting words, i.e. “but”, “and”) but these adverbs often function as conjunctions in joining two independent (sentences) clauses.
2.They serve as transitional devices between one main thought and another.
3.Because conjunctive adverbs are not true conjunctions, a semicolon is required when connecting two independent clauses.

Common Conjunctive Adverbs:
Accordingly
Afterwards
Also
Consequently
However
Indeed
Likewise
Moreover
Nevertheless
Nonetheless
Otherwise
Similarly
So*
Still
Therefore
(*may also be subordinating)
Conjunctive adverbs other than SO or OTHERWISE require a semicolon preceding them and a comma following them.
  • Superintendent Hill will be attending the lecture; accordingly, Assistant Superintendent Franke will be available for the luncheon.
    • The two clauses are independent. The semicolon replaces a coordinating conjunction and indicates that the two clauses are independent.
  • Captain Courtain wanted to see Mission Impossible 3; however, Captain Milhorn wanted to see TheDaVinciCode.
    • The two clauses are independent. The semicolon replaces a coordinating conjunction and indicates that the two clauses are independent.
SO and OTHERWISE do not require a comma following them when they are conjunctive adverbs.
  • The best candidate for the job missed her flight; so we will postpone the interviews until tomorrow.
    • For SO to be a subordinating conjunction the meaning must be IN ORDER THAT or WITH THE PURPOSE THAT. TO be a coordinating conjunction SO must mean DURING THE TIME THAT. When the meaning of SO is THEREFORE, it is a conjunctive adverb.
  • You will need to focus on the goal; otherwise it is easy to get distracted.
    • The two clauses are independent. The semicolon replaces a coordinating conjunction and indicates that the two clauses are independent, but no comma is required after OTHERWISE.
  • A conjunctive adverb connects two ideas (complete clauses/sentences). If the above words interrupt a thought, they are not conjunctive adverbs and are not punctuated as such.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 01-22-2007, 11:16 PM
M.S. (Offline)
Pencil pusher
Official Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 22
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default Tip #380

Industry Rule #380

writing teachers are shaaaidy.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 01-23-2007, 10:30 AM
starrwriter's Avatar
starrwriter (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 4,280
Thanks: 0
Thanks 4
Default

Originally Posted by M.S. View Post
Industry Rule #380
writing teachers are shaaaidy.
Those who can write write. Some who can't write teach writing.
__________________
"The earth was made round so we can't see too far down the road and know what is coming." -- Isak Dinesen, Out of Africa
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 01-24-2007, 10:58 AM
M.S. (Offline)
Pencil pusher
Official Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 22
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default read

I don't give any credence to most of these tips. I find them arbitrary and rigid. As an art form, it pains me to see writing restricted to such puritanical parameters. Indeed, there have been countless authors of note who completely ignore these supposed laws of writing. Henry Miller, Arthur Rimbaud, William Faulkner, Charles Bukowski, Thomas Doane are some of my favorite examples. To error is human, and it is the human in writing that many of us value. As a writer and an artist it is one's responsibility to perpetually question the meritt of these rules.. i.e. where they come from, why, and who put them there? Are they always useful in creating genuine expression or are they handcuffs?

On a constructive note, there is one tip that I would like to offer. It's a simple one and that is to READ,READ,READ. Beautiful writing is an overflow of inspiration. In order to experience this overflow, one must drink from the vast pool of passionate writing left to us by our peers and predecessors. As the work horse must be fed in abundance of oats to yield a productice day's work, so must the writer perpetually feed on the work of other authors in order to produce valuable writing.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 01-24-2007, 02:45 PM
starrwriter's Avatar
starrwriter (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 4,280
Thanks: 0
Thanks 4
Default

Originally Posted by M.S. View Post
I don't give any credence to most of these tips. I find them arbitrary and rigid ...
I agree with you. Great authors never paid any attention to so-called rules of writing fiction. They wrote from the hip and certain rules were later inferred from their work, but these rules are far from universal. Each writer must invent his own rules and find his or her own voice as a writer. That's the only way to produce quality fiction with strong originality.
__________________
"The earth was made round so we can't see too far down the road and know what is coming." -- Isak Dinesen, Out of Africa
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 01-30-2007, 02:20 PM
rhiloaded (Offline)
Pencil pusher
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Bognor Regis
Posts: 22
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default My tip

Hi,
Firstly, hope I'm posting this in the right place. I followed the given link and ended up where I started. If I or my computer are wrong please don't delete me, tell me that I am, or aforementioned computer is, an idiot, (kindly and gently we have feelings, or at least I do) and where I should go and I/we shall do my/our best to get there. Okay, her followeth The Tip:

To create vivid prose be specific. Don't just tell me he drove his car down the high street. I can't see that. Tell me he drove his black mercedes or purple mini - see how those two different cars conjour up two very different images of the driver before you've even met him. And you can always suprise us. Maybe purple mini guy is a sharp suited businessman with reasons of his own for driving such a vehicle. Don't just tell me she fell out of a tree when she was five, I might see a strudy oak and maybe you, the writer, had her climbing a beech or something. Specifics make pictures in the reader's mind, give them a more compelling reading experience. But don't go overboard. Okay she's eating a ham sandwhich, maybe even a ham sandwhich with pickles - but a ham sandwhich with pickles and cheese slices from the deli round the corner on wholemeal organic bread with sunflower seeds ....STOP.
Too much information is as bad as too little and sometimes, though it sounds like a cliche, less is more. We don't need to know the tiger was a black striped orange tiger, ever see one that wasn't? (Okay, it'd could've been a white tiger, but that is all we need to know.) Trust your reader's intelligence to realise the obvious and sometimes the one word convey's more than a whole paragraph. If your character is walking along a cliff path and is suddenly one step away from the edge with the sea pounding onto rocks below that is no time to digress into the areas flora and fauna nor the colour of the sea or a ship on the water - chances are she won't notice the latter anyway. Your reader can imagine the drop, feel the terror in knowing one more step would've put our heroine over the edge and that's all you need. But specifics, in their right place and not taken to extemes, can make a piece of writing much more vivid and real for the reader. Just remember, if you put the buisnessman in a purple mini on page one don't have him driving a silver Rolls Royce on page three with no explaination of the switch. The idea is to show your reader the car, not confuse them by having it metamorphose into something else entirely, otherwise said reader may think the author forgot what he/she said in the first place. And, of course, none of us would ever do that, would we?

Hope this helps

Rhiannon

Dazed and confused but still standing.
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 02-01-2007, 09:12 AM
BreezyWriter's Avatar
BreezyWriter (Offline)
Always Online
Official Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Drummondville, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 2,157
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

Hi Oasis Writer, I hope your doing well!

I find what you've written; to be very well explained. I"ve been looking at the Tips of the Day and I came across no 35 about CAPITALIZATION - RANK/TITLE
I have a question I hope you can answer it. I once was told that words like grandmother, grandfather, father and mother are to be capitalized if used to speak to them.
Example:
Hi Grandmother, can I have a cookie? While sentences like.
I saw your grandmother the other day. Are said without a capital. Could you clarify that for me. Maybe I have it wrong. One thing is for sure it confused me.
Answer:

When you are using it as a pronoun, then yes, you do capitalize it because to that person, it's like saying the name. Almost like, "Hi, Mom." Now, if that is what you call them, and it's being used as a pronoun, or a proper title of a person, then it is subjective to capitalize it. Sometimes, it's not needed, and people will debate it back and forth because it's not technically saying the name, like, "Hi, Jenny," - and yeah, people do write it like, "Hi, mom," and that's right as well. Either way is fine, but if it's being used as a pronoun, then it should be capped. Now, sentences like, "I saw your mom," - No, should not. That's not being used as a pronoun, because that person probably doesn't call that person mom. Now if it was a brother and that said, "Hey, I saw Mom a few minutes ago," then that's subjective and again, goes back to the whole, "Do or don't." It's almost like the oxford commas. I go with it, some don't.


Help at all?


Yes Thanks.
__________________
Timing is everything! love, peace, pleasure, prosperity to all

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 02-17-2008, 05:31 AM
Project_Xii (Offline)
Pencil pusher
Official Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 22
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default

Avoid repetition.
Best advice I can give Thesaurus is your friend, use it!
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 02-18-2008, 01:29 AM
Cordatus's Avatar
Cordatus (Offline)
Viscount of Vainglorious Deeds
Official Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: BLDG. 59
Posts: 2,567
Thanks: 0
Thanks 19
Default

Good advice, indeed!
__________________
"The universe is made of stories, not atoms."
-Muriel Rukeyser

Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 02-20-2008, 05:50 PM
OnceUponATime's Avatar
OnceUponATime (Offline)
Heartbreaking Writer of Staggering Genius
Official Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: State of Insanity - I must be in order to start my own paper...
Posts: 1,298
Thanks: 5
Thanks 12
Default

Writing tip:

Sit down in front of your computer, boot it up, launch your word processor program and begin typing. Another variant on this technique might be to pick up a pen or pencil, open a notepad or spiral-bound notebook and begin writing. I prefer the first method, but longhand works quite well, especially for writing purists.
__________________
Support your local newspaper -- and your local writers.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

-Jillian
Reply With Quote
Reply

  WritersBeat.com > Writing Craft > Tips & Advice


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:40 PM.

vBulletin, Copyright © 2000-2006, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.