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Someone out there must read Discworld books...

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Old 12-31-2005, 12:48 AM
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Default Someone out there must read Discworld books...


It seems like so many of you are into Fantasy/Sci-fi and yet I hear no talk about Discworld or even Hitchhickers Guide...

I avoid fantasy with a passion - but I own every single Discworld book (except the kids ones)... all 30+ of them! I think Pratchett is one of the best comedy writers still around...

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Old 12-31-2005, 12:51 AM
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I've read a couple, very funny!

And you shouldn't avoid any book because of its genre. If you hear something is good, give it a try, you may be surprised. Example: I always hated war books and such, I thought they were pretentious and pointless. But then I discovered that they're not all the same. Look at Tim O'Brien, he writes great books, and a great many of them are about or involve Vietnam. So I guess I'm saying you should keep as open a mind with books as you do with drugs ;-)
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Old 12-31-2005, 12:53 AM
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I loooove Hitchhikers guide myself.
And Ender's Game is another favorite of mine.
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Old 12-31-2005, 12:54 AM
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I don't like most fantasy (epic volumes don't often hold my interest unless they are exceedingly well done, and world-building is probably the most difficult writing exercise there is), but some has really grabbed me. Discworld is a good example, as is the Hitchhiker trilogy (in four parts).
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Old 12-31-2005, 12:58 AM
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I've always found that world-building is much better when the writer leaves it alone and lets it build itself. A good example of this would be LOTR, your view of middle earth expands as the main character's does. As the story emerges from the provinciality of the quaint village of Hobbiton, you are awed by the vastness of the world, just like Frodo. This is, in large part, why I think the series was such a success.
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Old 12-31-2005, 12:59 AM
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I didn't care much for Tolkien, I'm afraid. But I understand what you mean - it is exactly how I feel about plots for longer pieces. Focus on your characters and they will take you places you didn't expect to go.
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Old 12-31-2005, 01:10 AM
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Originally Posted by solecistic
I didn't care much for Tolkien, I'm afraid. But I understand what you mean - it is exactly how I feel about plots for longer pieces. Focus on your characters and they will take you places you didn't expect to go.
Exactly, the world should be a vehicle for your characters, not the other way around. And thats too bad about Tolkien. You should give it another try some time when you're looking for something to read. It really picks up half-way through the first book.
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Old 12-31-2005, 01:13 AM
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You're probably right. I read the trilogy at age 15, and five years later I wonder how much my world-view will have changed and how much that might affect how I feel about the story.
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Old 01-03-2006, 03:55 AM
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I found Lord of the Rings to be a dull tale full of unnecessary diversions. I did abandon the sequence one chapter from the end of The Fellowship of the Ring; I had better things to do. Like vegetating.

To return to the thread's topic, I found Terry Pratchett to be a waste of paper. I've only ever laughed at one joke from the beginning of The Colour of Magic although that's probably because I've never got past the first five pages because he's not got a way with words when not telling a joke. I've tried others by him, The Light Fantastic and Hogfather spring to mind, but they were just dull.

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Old 01-03-2006, 08:23 AM
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I love the Lord of the Rings and also the Hitchhiker's Guide.
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Old 01-04-2006, 12:42 AM
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Good. But we're talking about Terry Pratchett.
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Old 01-04-2006, 08:30 AM
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Ah Mr. Bitter.

Pratchett has a nice British witt that I really appreciate. It is rather different than the norm style of writing but at the same time I find after 10 or 20 pages I get really into the books. They are my -light- reading books... just stuff to read when I need a break from more deep works.

Either way I like how most of his writings/characters/places are homages or parodies to other works.. The most entertaining parts I find is just spotting all the different parralels in them.

But hey if you don't like them, don't read 'em I don't care haha
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Old 02-07-2006, 06:57 AM
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I love hitchhickers. I think I did make a thread on here ages ago... but that could have been a dream. I have never read any of Pratchett books... They've made a tv series of "Johney and the Bomb" so I'm thinking about getting some out at the library and have a go at reading them... but yeah thats a "thinking" about it.

Lord of the Rings is a no no. tried to read it... but seriously I have never read a more long winded over described blibber. I belive it is one of those books that just works better as a film. But thats just my opinion.

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Old 02-07-2006, 10:43 AM
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I read one of the Discworld novels, it had Sam Ramy or whoever that nightwatch guy is in it. But it wasn't anything great I believe. The book tries to be funny, and at first the premise is. But the author creates overtly serious situations in what is setup to be a really un-serious universe

As for Hitchhiker's. Funniest book(s) I've ever read.
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Old 04-23-2006, 08:56 PM
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I really enjoyed most of the Discworld books, though I haven't read any recently. Pratchett is a fine writer, who is capable of pulling off incredibly vivid, evocative scenes, but I think, if you read enough of his books, they tend to run together. I think I remember enjoying "Interesting Times" a whole lot. I also got the illustrated Discworld book, The Last Hero, which is quite lovely.

Solecistic, were you aware that there are actually 5 books in the Hitchhiker's Trilogy, not four? The fifth is called "Mostly Harmless." S'good.
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Old 04-23-2006, 11:22 PM
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I used to read Discworld novels, but actually found some other comedy fantasy writers more to my taste.

Plus, I am more into military scifi, most of the time I wouldn't even consider fantasy novels.
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Old 04-24-2006, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by TimD
I used to read Discworld novels, but actually found some other comedy fantasy writers more to my taste.

Plus, I am more into military scifi, most of the time I wouldn't even consider fantasy novels.
Who else out there does good comedic fantasy? Can't think of too many who are well known. I mean, "Good Omens" was a great, funny novel, written half by Neil Gaiman - but the other half was Pratchett.
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Old 05-18-2006, 10:09 PM
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In my opinion Terry Pratchet's Discworld books are really brilliant. It's easy reading (very important in our overcomplicated society) with some light humor. He also does a good job with characterization and other writing elements, but what I find fascinating is his foreshadowing ability. So many tiny and overlooked details in the beginning often play a significant role by the end. That and the real-world relevance can make analyzing the books a lot of fun.

It is true that his writing style tends to be a bit repetetive. After you've read a few, the rest seem to be very similar.
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Old 08-02-2013, 03:36 AM
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Hey I love the hitchhikers series...a lot. Sadly I don't have that much access to great comedy literature,so I don't know this pratchet guy. Buh I'm sure I'll love his stuff. Can I get names-the best first, please? On the tolkein topic, I found the books really interesting, if a lil too serious. And I hate that the series had a rather preachy, moralistic tone to it...there was hardly any gray-just black and white. But on the whole, the books aren't bad at all. I've tried out certain other fantasy writers like terry goodkind and the eragon series tho'-i like them,or at least I respect the art.
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Old 08-20-2013, 07:11 AM
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I've read a couple, I will no doubt read some more, if I ever get around to it. My favourite is Mort though it took me until the third reading to get why his name is ironic...I felt like an idiot!
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Old 09-03-2013, 02:56 AM
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my partner lovvvvves the discworld books believe hes read them all, he tried to get me into them and I did read the hogfather and the one with the going postal guy in the bank (cant remember its name) and although I can appreciate the guys amazing imagination and great plot lines I just cant get to grips with his style of writing. no matter how hard I try I just cant "lose" myself in them
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Old 09-03-2013, 04:49 AM
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I enjoy Terry Pratchett but agree I don't lose myself in either it or Hitchiker's the latter I prefer as a radio show to anything.

My choice of fantasy tends to be more Jim Butcher, Anne Lyle etc
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