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Grand Tour of the Classics - suggestions wanted please

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Old 08-31-2010, 05:25 AM
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Default Grand Tour of the Classics - suggestions wanted please


Im writing my TBR list and would like to complete over the next year a Grand Tour of the Classics - think the grand tours of aristocratic youth visiting and lounging about all over the world for a year, but with books! I will be kick starting it at the start of November (great tie in with Nanowrimo as I write historical fiction predominantly so will keep me in the right era!).

Now for the bit where you come in. I have a list going but I am a tad stuck and look to y'all for book suggestions that I could include. There are tons and tons of "classics" so the extra help would be useful, that and different people have different opinions of what is a classic? Post your suggestions if you would be so kind and I'll post the final long list that I will be reading as of 1st Nov. PS - the list needs to contain 52 books in total as I read one a week on average.

Thanks for your help in advance

x

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Old 08-31-2010, 06:18 AM
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For a week when you are quite busy try The Portrait of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. It's quite a short book but wonderful reading, totally absorbing.
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Old 08-31-2010, 06:52 AM
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The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri

Beowulf

I love epic poems. lol. These two are good. I'll come up with others later.
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Old 08-31-2010, 06:58 AM
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I love Beowulf!
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Old 08-31-2010, 07:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Redlorry View Post
For a week when you are quite busy try The Portrait of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. It's quite a short book but wonderful reading, totally absorbing.
I actually read this a few months back when there was all the hype about the movie. I had to read the book in order to see the movie! And I totally agree with you, I thought it was fantastic! The book I mean, not the film!
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Old 08-31-2010, 08:03 AM
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The film was dire, it was an ego trip for ben Barnes, which is a shame as I like Ben Barnes, so would not want to say anything against him. But it was terrible. If people saw the film before reading the book, I have no doubt they would give the book a wide berth. Such a shame

I've seen other versions of Dorian Gray too, and if I'm honest I prefer the slightly cheesy one portrayed in 'The Extraordinary League of Gentlemen'
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Old 09-01-2010, 03:40 PM
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Oh wow.
My top picks:


Dostoevsky:
Crime & Punishment
Brothers Karamazov
Notes from Underground
good & evil, redemption & choice, human psychology

Borges:
Short Stories
language & information, memory & identity, magic

Hemingway:
Short Stories
A Farewell to Arms
how to write: iceberg theory: what you leave out is more important than what you leave in
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Old 09-07-2010, 05:41 AM
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Catcher In The Rye: Salinger
Crow Road: Banks
The Wasp Factory: Banks
The Secret Lemonade Drinker: ?
Lord Of The Rings Trilogy: Tolkien
The Hobbit: Tolkien
The Name Of The Rose: Eco
Foucault's Pendulum: Eco
Although Not Really Classics In The Truest Sense ,i Hope They Will Be In The Future.
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Old 09-07-2010, 05:47 AM
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Anything by Arthur Conan Doyle - He wrote 50+ short stories and 4 novels about Sherlock Holmes and also wrote books such as The Lost World.
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Old 09-07-2010, 07:17 AM
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Absolute required reading are Voltaire's Candide and the short stories of De Maupassant and Chekov. Not just because they're 'classics' but they're great, easy reads too. No point reading classics if they're going to bore the backside off you.
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Old 09-07-2010, 07:27 AM
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I'm a 19th C type of gal, so:

Villette - Bronte
Wuthering Heights - Bronte
Middlemarch - Eliot
Great Expectations - Dickens
North and South - Gaskell
Lady Audley's Secret - Braddon

Also, agree with David Wallace on The Name of the Rose.

I'd put de Bernieres in there too - Birds Without Wings and Captain Corelli's Mandolin.

Memoirs of a Geisha - Golden
Lord of the Flies - Golding

Edit: And The Diary of Anne Frank.
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Old 09-07-2010, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Redlorry View Post
For a week when you are quite busy try The Portrait of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. It's quite a short book but wonderful reading, totally absorbing.
I found this at a bookstore this weekend for $4. What a steal!
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Old 09-12-2010, 02:46 AM
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Books mentioned so far are certainly wonderful books to read.

May I suggest:

Treasure Island by Robert Lois Stevenson
Jules Verne (Around the World in 80 Days, and other stories)
Mark Twain (The adventures of Huckleberry Finn/Tom Sawyer)
The Land that Time Forgot by Edgar Rice Burroughs (Trilogy)
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs (about 6 books in this series)
Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome

This book is my favorite but may not be a classic: The Light in the Forest by Conrad Richter

Last edited by Tekakwitha; 09-12-2010 at 02:47 AM.. Reason: corrected wording in first sentence
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Old 09-13-2010, 07:03 AM
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The House of the Seven Gables - Hawthorne
The Great Gatsby - Fitzgerald
On the Road - Kerouac
The Return of the Native - Hardy
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Old 09-13-2010, 07:01 PM
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Though they aren't the same kind of classics as the other books mentioned, I'd wholly recommend 1984 and Animal Farm by George Orwell. I really think they are must reads.

The Odyssey - Homer
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley (written in the 30s but still a classic I think)
Tess of the d'Ubervilles - Thomas Hardy
Jane Austen in general (lighter reading)
Moby Dick - Herman Melville
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
Shakespeare in general
Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
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Old 09-28-2010, 08:54 AM
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Jane Eyre -Charlotte Bronte
Vanity Fair - Thackeray
(I'll second that on) Brave New World -Huxley
Count of Monte Cristo - Dumas
East of Eden - Steinbeck
The Stranger - Camus
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn - Betty Smith
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Old 10-16-2010, 10:00 AM
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It's tough, you have your:

1. Ancient classics, from the Greek and Roman era. Then you have your:

2. Literary classics, from the early days of mass publishing, the ones that were read by everybody, often because they were good, sometimes because there wasn't a lot else to read. Then you have your:

3. Popular classics, which are the ones people most often recommend to each other today because they really are so good.

People have recommended a plethora of all three so far.

I'm not so good on the ancient classics I'm afraid, and I don't think you're talking about popular classics, so for my tuppence worth I suppose:

Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux.

The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo.

At least one by Alexander Dumas, so I'd go with La Reine Margot or The Three Musketeers just for brevity's sake.

Lady Chatterley's Lover by D. H. Lawrence.

And something by Jules Verne. Did you know he wrote Journey to the Centre of the Earth whilst inspired by the underground caves in Majorca? They have a whole all-singing, all-dancing show there today. I'd avoid Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea unless you want to know an awful lot about subspecies of crustaceans....*yawn*

Last edited by Kasubi; 10-16-2010 at 10:03 AM..
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Old 10-25-2010, 10:30 AM
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Just something off the top of my head, as I re-read it recently; if you're into Russian literature try the short(ish) story The Overcoat by Gogol.

Last edited by Nadja; 10-25-2010 at 10:33 AM..
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Old 11-27-2010, 02:57 AM
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what rosiewriter said about "1984" by Orwell. and Huxley's "Brave New World".


very important books; must-reads for everyone!
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