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What are the different types of poetry?

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Old 12-14-2005, 06:36 PM
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Default What are the different types of poetry?


From Mackb



Meter & poem types
by JP on writing forum
These are some of the types of like meter.

Iambus:A metrical foot in poetry, a step of sorts, where one unaccented syllable is followed by one accented syllable.

( pa DUM) = the beat of the line
---1--2--3---4---5-----6----7----8------------
---I saw a girl once made of stone--------- ----pa DUM pa DUM pa DUM pa DUM ---------
----1---2---3---4---5----6---7----8------------------

*

Trochee:** The opposite of iambus, where one accented syllable is followed by one unaccented syllable.* (DUM pa)

**************** Have you but a flick ered Life? ---DUM pa DUM pa DUM pa DUM
----------------------------------------------------------------------
*

Spondee:* Two long or stressed syllables, you know, DUM DUM**
----------------------------------------------------------------------
*

Pyrrhic:*** Two short unaccented syllables, you know, pa pa.*
---------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Anapest:* An anapest is a three-syllable foot with the third syllable being the stressed one, like the word "unconcerned".
--------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Dactyl:** The opposite of an anapest.* There are three syllables, but the first of the three is the stressed syllable, like the **************** *** word, "Matriarch" or "Motherly".
---------------------------------------------------------------------These are some of the types of poems


Acrostic poetry

Acrostic poems differ from other poetry in that the first letter of each line spells a word, which can be read vertically.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Ballad

A ballad is a simple poem with short verses. It often tells a story about people that you would read about in folk tales.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Blank verse

This kind of poetry is essentially the unrhymed counterpart of many types of poems written in a very specific meter.*
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Cinquain

A Cinquain is a short, unrhymed poem consisting of twenty-two syllables distributed as 2, 4, 6, 8, 2, in five lines.

The most popular form is as follows:

Line 1: Noun
Line 2: Description of Noun
Line 3: Action
Line 4: Feeling or Effect
Line 5: Synonym of the initial noun.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Epic

An Epic is a long narrative poem celebrating the adventures and achievements of a hero...epics deal with the traditions, mythical or historical, of a nation.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Epigram

Epigrams are short satirical poems ending with either a humorous retort or a stinging punchline.
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Narrative poetry

This is poetry that tells a story; it relays a particular event or happening and is usually a very long story.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Free Verse

This is* poetry that doesn't follow any set pattern. It doesn't rhyme and there is no definite beat or rhythm to the sound of the words.

Poetry Lessons on Forms of Poetry

It is a great idea to experiment with the different forms of poetry.* Below you will find only a few, but some of the most popular forms of poetry.

Acrostic poetry

Acrostic poems differ from other poetry in that the first letter of each line spells a word, which can be read vertically. The rhyme scheme and number of lines may vary in acrostic poems because it is more of a descriptive poem in which one describes the word being spelled.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Ballad

A ballad is a simple poem with short verses. It often tells a story about people that you would read about in folk tales. Ballads were told to people long before they were written down. They were about revenge, crime and love. They were often turned into songs, the singers usually wandering minstrels. Ballad "The Death of Ben Hall"
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Blank verse

This kind of poetry is essentially the unrhymed counterpart of many types of poems written in a very specific meter.* For example, you could write a sonnet with perfect iambic pentameter, but forsake the rhyme.* The benefit of this is that the poet does not have to worry about fitting lines into rhyme and creating a coerced sounding image, yet the poem remains very structured.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Cinquain

A Cinquain is a short, unrhymed poem consisting of twenty-two

syllables distributed as 2, 4, 6, 8, 2, in five lines.

The most popular form is as follows:

Line 1: Noun

Line 2: Description of Noun

Line 3: Action

Line 4: Feeling or Effect

Line 5: Synonym of the initial noun.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Epic

An Epic is a long narrative poem celebrating the adventures and

achievements of a hero...epics deal with the traditions, mythical

or historical, of a nation.

examples:* Beowulf, The Iliad and the Odyssey, and Aeneid
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Epigram

Epigrams are short satirical poems ending with either a humorous retort

or a stinging punchline.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Narrative poetry

This is poetry that tells a story; it relays a particular event or happening and is usually a very long story. Narrative poems :

"The Pied Piper of Hamelin" by Robert Browning,
"The Owl and the Pussy Cat" by Edward Lear,
"The Man From Snowy River" by Banjo Patterson.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Free Verse

This is* poetry that doesn't follow any set pattern. It doesn't rhyme and there is no definite beat or rhythm to the sound of the words. This form of poetry is the most popular form in contemporary literature.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kyrielle

A Kyrielle is a French form of rhyming poetry written in quatrains

(a stanza consisting of 4 lines), and each quatrain contains a repeating

line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each

stanza). Each line within the poem consists of only eight syllables.

There is no limit to the amount of stanzas a Kyrielle may have, but

three is considered the accepted minimum.


Some popular rhyming schemes for a Kyrielle are:

aabB, ccbB, ddbB, with B being the repeated line, or abaB, cbcB, dbdB.

Mixing up the rhyme scheme is possible for an unusual pattern of:

axaZ, bxbZ, czcZ, dxdZ, etc. with Z being the repeated line.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Kyrielle Sonnet

A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and

a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle

Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing

as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet

consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to

link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the

first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would

also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming

scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be:

AabB, ccbB, ddbB, AB -or- AbaB, cbcB, dbdB, AB.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Limericks

These are humorous rhyming poems of five lines. Usually the first two lines and the last line are longer, and the third and fourth lines are short.* A typical rhymes scheme is a a b b a.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Ode

An Ode is a poem praising and glorifying a person, place or thing.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Septuplet

The Septuplet is a poem consisting of seven lines containing fourteen words with a break in between the two parts.* Both parts deal with the same thought and create a picture. Used mainly as expressions of social criticism or political satire, the most common forms are written as a couplet: a pair of rhymed lines in the same meter.

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Old 12-14-2005, 07:37 PM
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There are categories of poetry according to their content but as for forms, there are quite a great many. Limerick, tanka, haiku, sonnet just to name a few of the common ones. And I thought I was the mod here.
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Old 12-14-2005, 07:46 PM
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I needed you to register. You are now a mod
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Old 12-14-2005, 07:47 PM
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Then there are the ones you do in 5th grade, such as diamontes and cinquains. One hardly sees those in professional poetry.
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Old 12-14-2005, 07:55 PM
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Ah, thanks for clearing that up. It stumped me when I realized I never really wrote poems. And if I did it was entirely from my own imagination, not any such structure.
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Old 12-15-2005, 04:45 PM
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Originally Posted by DeathDragon
Then there are the ones you do in 5th grade, such as diamontes and cinquains. One hardly sees those in professional poetry.
I thought cinquains were just a unit of stanzas, like the quatrain.
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Old 01-09-2006, 02:53 PM
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Courtesy of my research at www.writersforum.com, enjoy.

Meter & poem types
by JP on writing forum
These are some of the types of like meter.

Iambus:A metrical foot in poetry, a step of sorts, where one unaccented syllable is followed by one accented syllable.

( pa DUM) = the beat of the line
---1--2--3---4---5-----6----7----8------------
---I saw a girl once made of stone--------- ----pa DUM pa DUM pa DUM pa DUM ---------
----1---2---3---4---5----6---7----8------------------

*

Trochee:** The opposite of iambus, where one accented syllable is followed by one unaccented syllable.* (DUM pa)

**************** Have you but a flick ered Life? ---DUM pa DUM pa DUM pa DUM
----------------------------------------------------------------------
*

Spondee:* Two long or stressed syllables, you know, DUM DUM**
----------------------------------------------------------------------
*

Pyrrhic:*** Two short unaccented syllables, you know, pa pa.*
---------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Anapest:* An anapest is a three-syllable foot with the third syllable being the stressed one, like the word "unconcerned".
--------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Dactyl:** The opposite of an anapest.* There are three syllables, but the first of the three is the stressed syllable, like the **************** *** word, "Matriarch" or "Motherly".
---------------------------------------------------------------------These are some of the types of poems


Acrostic poetry

Acrostic poems differ from other poetry in that the first letter of each line spells a word, which can be read vertically.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Ballad

A ballad is a simple poem with short verses. It often tells a story about people that you would read about in folk tales.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Blank verse

This kind of poetry is essentially the unrhymed counterpart of many types of poems written in a very specific meter.*
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Cinquain

A Cinquain is a short, unrhymed poem consisting of twenty-two syllables distributed as 2, 4, 6, 8, 2, in five lines.

The most popular form is as follows:

Line 1: Noun
Line 2: Description of Noun
Line 3: Action
Line 4: Feeling or Effect
Line 5: Synonym of the initial noun.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Epic

An Epic is a long narrative poem celebrating the adventures and achievements of a hero...epics deal with the traditions, mythical or historical, of a nation.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Epigram

Epigrams are short satirical poems ending with either a humorous retort or a stinging punchline.
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Narrative poetry

This is poetry that tells a story; it relays a particular event or happening and is usually a very long story.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Free Verse

This is* poetry that doesn't follow any set pattern. It doesn't rhyme and there is no definite beat or rhythm to the sound of the words.

Poetry Lessons on Forms of Poetry

It is a great idea to experiment with the different forms of poetry.* Below you will find only a few, but some of the most popular forms of poetry.

Acrostic poetry

Acrostic poems differ from other poetry in that the first letter of each line spells a word, which can be read vertically. The rhyme scheme and number of lines may vary in acrostic poems because it is more of a descriptive poem in which one describes the word being spelled.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Ballad

A ballad is a simple poem with short verses. It often tells a story about people that you would read about in folk tales. Ballads were told to people long before they were written down. They were about revenge, crime and love. They were often turned into songs, the singers usually wandering minstrels. Ballad "The Death of Ben Hall"
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Blank verse

This kind of poetry is essentially the unrhymed counterpart of many types of poems written in a very specific meter.* For example, you could write a sonnet with perfect iambic pentameter, but forsake the rhyme.* The benefit of this is that the poet does not have to worry about fitting lines into rhyme and creating a coerced sounding image, yet the poem remains very structured.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Cinquain

A Cinquain is a short, unrhymed poem consisting of twenty-two

syllables distributed as 2, 4, 6, 8, 2, in five lines.

The most popular form is as follows:

Line 1: Noun

Line 2: Description of Noun

Line 3: Action

Line 4: Feeling or Effect

Line 5: Synonym of the initial noun.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Epic

An Epic is a long narrative poem celebrating the adventures and

achievements of a hero...epics deal with the traditions, mythical

or historical, of a nation.

examples:* Beowulf, The Iliad and the Odyssey, and Aeneid
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Epigram

Epigrams are short satirical poems ending with either a humorous retort

or a stinging punchline.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Narrative poetry

This is poetry that tells a story; it relays a particular event or happening and is usually a very long story. Narrative poems :

"The Pied Piper of Hamelin" by Robert Browning,
"The Owl and the Pussy Cat" by Edward Lear,
"The Man From Snowy River" by Banjo Patterson.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Free Verse

This is* poetry that doesn't follow any set pattern. It doesn't rhyme and there is no definite beat or rhythm to the sound of the words. This form of poetry is the most popular form in contemporary literature.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kyrielle

A Kyrielle is a French form of rhyming poetry written in quatrains

(a stanza consisting of 4 lines), and each quatrain contains a repeating

line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each

stanza). Each line within the poem consists of only eight syllables.

There is no limit to the amount of stanzas a Kyrielle may have, but

three is considered the accepted minimum.


Some popular rhyming schemes for a Kyrielle are:

aabB, ccbB, ddbB, with B being the repeated line, or abaB, cbcB, dbdB.

Mixing up the rhyme scheme is possible for an unusual pattern of:

axaZ, bxbZ, czcZ, dxdZ, etc. with Z being the repeated line.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

*

Kyrielle Sonnet

A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and

a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle

Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing

as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet

consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to

link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the

first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would

also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming

scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be:

AabB, ccbB, ddbB, AB -or- AbaB, cbcB, dbdB, AB.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Limericks

These are humorous rhyming poems of five lines. Usually the first two lines and the last line are longer, and the third and fourth lines are short.* A typical rhymes scheme is a a b b a.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Ode

An Ode is a poem praising and glorifying a person, place or thing.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Septuplet

The Septuplet is a poem consisting of seven lines containing fourteen words with a break in between the two parts.* Both parts deal with the same thought and create a picture. Used mainly as expressions of social criticism or political satire, the most common forms are written as a couplet: a pair of rhymed lines in the same meter.
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Old 01-09-2006, 02:57 PM
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Excellent, this is great. Stickied.
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Old 01-09-2006, 08:42 PM
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wow thank you very much for the inforamtion learned allot thank you again
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Old 05-02-2006, 08:46 AM
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Also, this site URL has excellent examples and styles of poetry. I recommend it to all Poets.



Shadow Poetry

Or this url that I created, using Shadow Poetry as my sourse.

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Old 05-06-2006, 09:28 PM
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hey thanks oasis for the site
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Old 05-06-2006, 09:58 PM
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Those have all the types of Poetry, or a lot of them, so they are very affective. I'm glad they helped you.
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Old 05-07-2006, 02:27 AM
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The main problem for critiqueing anybodies work is when the poem seems to fallow two or even three styles of poetry. You aren't going to be able to make any comments like, "that just didn't work, you followed a format then suddenly changed for a couple of lines, breaking everything up, then restarted in the same or different format from first format whilst still inside 'verses.' " Unless the writer is honest enough to say, "oh, what was I thinking," the threads have to be prevented from becoming flame wars like every other writing community I've been a member of over the years.

I've had students tell me that their modern poetry is special, advanced, that I'm clueless. Yet I know quite a few teachers and am in education myself and know that in many cases students creativity is pushed and encouraged, even if they get things wrong. Carrying out the action of writing is preferable to telling the students they are going wrong and them giving up on writing because it is too hard

I don't like it when people ram their poetry down your throat, even when it doesn't work, telling you it is the creation of genius and that you are wrong, unintelligent or clueless! So moderating the poetry forum might end up being the most difficult job on this forum
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Old 05-07-2006, 08:12 AM
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Then its going to be one hell of a ride for me and I'm up for it

That list has examples of how to write them, as a guide, so that if someone wants to try a sonnet, or an ode, but doesn't know how, they can check it and go, "Oh, okay-" Mixing patterns, ha - I love that. Shows originality We aren't copiers here, we're all each different human beings, so I hope to see every different type of poem. If there is a mistake, or something they can improve on, I'll point it out if I see it, but that doesn't make their poem worthless.

lmao - I'm not even sure if that was pointed to me Tim, oh well, I like to talk
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Old 05-17-2006, 06:06 AM
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I wonder if it might be possible to consider that free verse should be defined a little more than this definition does:
This is* poetry that doesn't follow any set pattern. It doesn't rhyme and there is no definite beat or rhythm to the sound of the words. This form of poetry is the most popular form in contemporary literature.
What the poet does when writing so-called free verse is to re-invent the wheel so to speak, by (perhaps inadvertently) developing a brand new set of rules for each poem.

To fully appreciate the poem, the reader has to become atuned to these rules; for example, when I write some pieces, I find myself trying to develop a construct that will open up the concept I have for as wide a range of readers as I can: sometimes I will use a juxtaposition which may be the only way to express the inexplicable: for example: I might simply say someone has a peaches and pickle complexion in the context, that could be a very succinct way of making the reader feel queasy or uncertain about the person shazbat! what I am trying to say is that the free verse "form" allows me to shake up expectations by establishing my own rules in an unexpected way so that I can use enjambments or juxtapositions in a highly effective way. (Why can't I ever think of even a poor example when I need it?)

As I was saying in a different thread yesterday, poetry is different from prose in that if you can fully understand a verse, it is not really poetry, but rather exposition or narrative; poetry is really all about leaving you with something that is more than a simple thought, something perplexing and complex, yet simple at the same time. Free verse helps you to get to that level of expression in a way nothing else can.

But then, as Robert Frost said (and I heard him say it) "Free verse? why, that's like playing tennis with the net down."
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Old 07-10-2006, 03:45 PM
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This is going to make writing poems so much easier. I forgot nearly half of the poems that I have done before that you listed there. Now I can rack my brain for something useful to write!
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Old 07-21-2006, 02:16 PM
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Why don't you move this discussion into the workshop section instead/
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Old 07-21-2006, 05:02 PM
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heh, you want a list of poetry forms? here's a huge one:

http://www.poetryrenewal.com/forms/menu.shtml
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Old 08-16-2006, 02:19 AM
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great information--thank you
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Old 01-05-2012, 06:04 PM
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Yeah... I don't really know much about the types of poetry I'd say you should just follow your heart as inspiration and put pen to paper
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Old 01-06-2012, 07:08 AM
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Thank you all for continuing to post while I was away recovering from heart surgery.. A double pacemaker now keeps me alive and now every day is a Saturday to me.

Kelvin, I see your kind of poetry everywhere and it only resembles the ramblings of undisciplined writers. To me it is just poetry anarchy!!
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Old 01-06-2012, 07:38 AM
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With a very rare exception, I think most "poets" would benefit from reading more actual poetry.
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Old 01-06-2012, 07:59 PM
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Courtney, Amen!!
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