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A New Arrival - Play

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Old 07-27-2014, 12:45 PM
Evan Bovey's Avatar
Evan Bovey (Offline)
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Default A New Arrival - Play


Feel free to critique my work. Many thanks...



ACT 1. SCENE 1. INT. JULIE'S KITCHEN. DAY

GEORGE: [rising up] When you dream of marshes you don't talk to the frogs.

JULIE: [incredulously] Excuse me?

GEORGE: [flatly] It doesn't matter.

JULIE: [stoically] No, say what you were about to say.

THE DOORBELL RINGS.

GEORGE: That's the postman.

ANSWERS DOOR, SIGNS FOR PACKAGE.

JULIE: [firmly] Say what you were going to say.

GEORGE: [bitterly] I'm sick of it. I'm sick of everything.

BABY CRIES.

JULIE: [good humouredly] Things will get better.

GEORGE: [defiantly] Will they? How exactly will they get better? Tell me that. [remorsefully] I shouldn't have said that, I'm sorry. [gravelly] I've never had a proper job; I don't have any work experience. What with you not being able to work and now we've got Chloe, who needs fed and nappies. If it wasn't for your parents I don't know what we'd do. My parents couldn't give a flying...

JULIE: [proudly] You've got your degree, that's something.

GEORGE: [vehemently] I wish I didn't have that bloody degree, it was a waste of time. When I think I could could have been working and making a career for myself instead of studying. Now look at me, 35 with no prospects. Employers don't want ex-students, they want people who've worked from school. What the hell am I going do?!

JULIE: You can start by calming down. Lorrie and Stephen are coming any minute.

GEORGE: [exasperation] It's OK for you, you're middle class.

JULIE: [aggressively interjects] Not this again.

GEORGE: Your parents will help you out. What do I know of sailing, wine and cheese nights? I'm working class, I know about signing on, Buckfast, cheap grass and shell suits. Do you know what a chav is, JULIE?

JULIE: [severely] Don't you dare take this out on me.

GEORGE: [spitefully] Then I thought, the forces, they'll take me, they'll take anyone. And guess what? If you've been hospitalised for depression you can't join the army. Do you hear that?

DOOR BELL RINGS.

JULIE: [desperately] That's them. You better behave yourself.

GEORGE: [indignantly] I'm going to my room.

ACT 2. SCENE 2. INT. JULIE'S LIVING ROOM. DAY

OPENS DOOR.

JULIE: [brightly] Hello.

LORRIE: [warmly] Hello.

JULIE: How are you? Come in, come in.

STEPHEN: [dryly] Hi.

LORRIE: [primly] Oh, we're fine, Natasha's with her granny today, so we've taken the opportunity to do a bit of shopping in town. And how's the new baby?

JULIE: [confident, smiling at LORRIE] Chloe's fine, she's sleeping now. George's having a shower, he'll be out in a moment.
[to STEPHEN] How's work?

STEPHEN: [enigmatically] Work's good. I'm just back from Abu Dhabi, weather was great, yeah, really good. Shops are out of this world.

LORRIE: That's the Moses' basket we said we'd bring. As you can see it's been hardly used. We're not having another so you may as well get the use of it.

JULIE: It's lovely, thank you. I'll put it in the room.

GEORGE [reproachfully to LORRIE]: Hi

LORRIE [innocently to GEORGE]: Hi

STEPHEN: [confidently] Hi George.

GEORGE: [to Stephen] How are things?

STEPHEN: Oh, you know, working away. We're just back from Abu. And you?

JULIE: [hurriedly] George is between contracts at the moment, aren't you, George?

GEORGE: [seething] I can speak for myself, dear. I'm signing on at the moment. [humorously] On the brew, as they say in Scotland.

STEPHEN: [jocularly] Oh well, I'm sure you'll get something.

GEORGE: [grimly] What makes you think that?

JULIE: [startled] GEORGE! Oh, he is funny, cheeky but funny.

GEORGE: [with anguish in his voice] Still got the Mercedes, Stephen?

STEPHEN: [strongly and affectionately] Actually, we fancied a change, we upgraded her for an S-Type Jag. 2 years old but with the hours I've put in in Abu, well, you know. We won't feel the dent as much.

GEORGE: [without earnest] Well, it's good to know the credit crunch hasn't affected everybody, I guess.

SCENE 3. INT. DINING HALL. DAY

GEORGE: [bitterly] I've never liked you.

JULIE: [amazed] GEORGE! Take that back.

GEORGE: [strongly remonstrating] It's true, do you want me to lie?

JULIE: [insisting] We're having lunch George. This is hardly the time to off-load your emotional baggage.

GEORGE: [disconcerted] I can't believe you're on their side.

LORRIE: [embarrassed] Steady on, George. We know you're under pressure, what with being unemployed and all, but we're really proud of you.

GEORGE: [beside himself] I don't need you patronising me.

THROWS MONEY ON TABLE.

SCENE 4. INT. JULIE'S LIVING ROOM. DAY.

JULIE: [struggling with tears] For God's sake George, do you have to start a carry-on every time we have people over? If it's not one thing it's another.

GEORGE: [insisting] He started it, with his sneering. I hate people like him.

JULIE: [flippantly] I'm going to my mother's, George, you can rot for all I care.

GEORGE: [maturely] What about Chloe?

JULIE: [obstinately] I'm taking her with me.

GEORGE: [drawing back a little] You can't. I love you both, Julie. [energetically] I'm doing this for both of you.

JULIE: [provoked to a sudden resolution] Doing what for both of us? Embarrassing me in front of Lorrie and Stephen.

GEORGE: [meditatively, as if the recollection were a tender one] Do you remember The Godfather 2?

JULIE: [grimly] What the hell are you on about George?

GEORGE: In the film, Robert De Niro can't feed his starving baby, so he kills the greedy Don and becomes the Godfather.

JULIE: [abruptly] So?

GEORGE: [sincerely] I don't know who to kill.

JULIE: [eagerly] You're crazy.

GEORGE: I mean, I don't know what I've got to do to get a job. You know I love you, I just can't catch a break.

JULIE: [triumphantly] I love you George but you need time on your own, I'm going to my mother's.

GEORGE: [fiercely] Don't do this!

BOTH WALK OFF STAGE.

ACT 3. SCENE 5

JULIE: [tormentingly] Let go of me, you psycho.

GEORGE: [very gravely] I'll get a job Julie, I'll sell drugs.

JULIE: [harshly] Let go.

GEORGE: [bent on taking care of his errant partner] Stop making a scene and get back upstairs.

JULIE: [vehemently] No, George. I don't want you to sell drugs. I won't have any part of your schemes.

GEORGE: [highly incensed] I'll kill myself.

JULIE: [with intense conviction] Grow a pair George. I'll be back once you've regained your sanity.

GEORGE: [rising, breathless with indignation] What do you want me to do? Rob a bank?!

JULIE: [miserably nervous and disconcerted] GEORGE! It's not about the money, it's never been about money, it's you. You need to calm the hell down down. You really embarrassed me today.

GEORGE: [fretfully] Why do you care what they think, Julie? They've never done nothing but patronise us. He was loving rubbing in the fact that I'm signing on, and that he's in oil.

JULIE: [rising threateningly] That's in your mind George. They're not as concerned about status as you are.

GEORGE: [collapsing into an abyss of wounded feeling] I hate how nice they are. How everything is rosy in their world.

JULIE: [deeply offended by his violence] Goodbye George. Chloe, say goodbye to your father.

SCENE 6. INT. JULIE'S FLAT. DAY

GEORGE OPENS THE BOX AND REMOVES A GUN.

GEORGE: [retreating, chilled] Power comes from the barrel of a gun, who said that? It giveth life and it taketh away. If there was one thing I could do to get a job. It's like my mum said, “you either be a great success or you'll be a great failure.” Time's been a great tester for that statement. And here I am, a failure, failed, that's how I feel. That life's a bouquet of misery, disappointment and loneliness. You try your best, try to stay upbeat in the face of all the kickings, then some twit comes along and
rubs your face in it. No matter how good a dad I am, how loving a husband I can be, she'll still need milk and nappies. And if you can't provide that, you're not a real man. You're a liability to your family. Just another mouth to feed, when there's no money. What with Julie's disability...with this [gestures to gun] the possibilities are endless.
THE END[/SIZE]

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